Women's Earth & Climate Action Network, International
The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network is a solutions-based, multi-faceted effort established to engage women worldwide to take action as powerful stakeholders in climate change and sustainability solutions. For Our Earth and Future Generations A project of Women's Earth and Climate Caucus and its partner eraGlobal Alliance

News from 2017

PRESS RELEASE - DNB Bank Divests: Responses from Standing Rock Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Norway

March 27, 2017

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 27, 2017


Media Contact

General requests - Emily Arasim, +1(505) 920-0153, emily@wecaninternational.org

Urgent requests in Norway- Osprey Orielle Lake, +(415) 722-2104, osprey@wecaninternational.org


DNB Bank Divests - Responses from Standing Rock

Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Norway

 

OSLO, NORWAY (March  27 , 2017) - Having travelled 5,000 miles from the United States to deliver an urgent message regarding the human rights and Indigenous rights violations in their homelands, the Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Norway and allies is pleased with the announcement from Norwegian bank, DNB, regarding the cancellation of its $2.5 billion USD credit line to fund the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).


Through inputs from diverse groups and an independent investigation, DNB confirmed the lack of consultation with the Standing Rock Sioux and violation of Indigenous rights. As a result, the financial institution has fully and completely divested from the project.

 

The Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Norway, organized and supported by the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International in response to requests from frontline Indigenous women leaders, traveled to Norway late last week to share experiences from Standing Rock and request that financial institutions divest from DAPL and other fossil fuel developments, which threaten the cultural survival of their nations and peoples.


In strategic platforms, the Delegation members are providing direct testimony on the impacts of extractive industries, oil spills, and contamination - particularly on women and children. The Delegation has called for immediate fossil fuel divestment and is encouraging the pursuit of investment in a just transition to renewable energy.

 

The Delegation hopes DNB’s decision to divest will reverberate to the other 15 international banks engaged in DAPL and the Oil Fund to further actions for divestment in respect to human rights, inherent tribal sovereign rights, water rights, and treaty rights of Indian tribes in the United States. With DNB’s divestment announcement, the Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Norway helped tipped the scales of justice toward the standard of consultation and consent affirmed and recognized by the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

 

Today, Monday March 27, the Delegation will continue in action towards this goal during a meeting with the Council on Ethics of the Oil Fund. Later this week, public events and a press conference will be held during which spokeswomen will share their firsthand experiences from Standing Rock, and analysis of the recent DNB divestment.


Members of the press are encouraged to reach out with questions and media requests for spokeswomen - Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle (Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota living and working on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation); Wasté Win Young (Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer); Tara Houska (Anishinaabe, tribal attorney, National Campaigns Director of Honor the Earth, and former advisor on Native American affairs to Bernie Sanders); Autumn Chacon (Diné/Navajo writer and performance artist); and Michelle Cook (Diné/Navajo, human rights lawyer and a founding member of the of the Water Protector Legal Collective at Standing Rock). [Full spokes-women biographies available here]

 

"We are thankful that while here in Norway, DNB announced that it will financially divest from the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL). While this is a step in the right direction we continue to push the Norweigan oil fund and other financial institutions to divest from DAPL because of the human and civil rights violations that have occurred against the people and indigenous communities at Standing Rock. Norway is a leader in the global community and by taking this step to divest from the DAPL their actions can cause a ripple effect throughout the world, for the greater good." explains Wasté Win Yellowlodge Young, Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa, member the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe


“DNB divesting from the Dakota Access Pipeline and Energy Transfer partners is encouraging. This is the first wave of funders and corporations being held accountable by the people who want a future for our children based on renewable energy.” explained Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle, Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota living and working on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation

 

"The momentum of this movement is steadily building. The people are taking matters into our own hands and pushing banks, cities, and municipalities to stop investing into destructive fossil fuel projects like Dakota Access. If corporations won't listen to morality, they will listen to money." explains Tara Houska, Anishinaabe, tribal attorney, National Campaigns Director of Honor the Earth, former advisor on Native American affairs to Bernie Sanders


“We are thrilled with DNB’s decision to divest from DAPL and respect indigenous human rights and tribal sovereignty. We hope that this decision will spread to the other 15 banks and the Oil Fund to completely divest.” explains Michelle Cook, Diné/Navajo, human rights lawyer and a founding member of the of the Water Protector Legal Collective at Standing Rock)

 

"Regarding DNB's announcement to divest from the Dakota access pipeline I am pleased to hear that they are willing to be cooperative . however we have been told this many times before as first Nations people, and we are conditioned to be apprehensive when promises are made. this is not to discredit the integrity of DNB but historically we have been lied to, and thus will only be satisfied when we can see their words put into action." explains Autumn Chacon, artist, activist and Water Protector

 

“As the divestment of DNB from the Dakota Access Pipeline shows, this fight is far from over, and we do have the power to expose and alter the practices of those funding and constructing such devastating extraction projects. With the voices of frontline Indigenous women leaders at the forefront - we are spreading a clear message across the country and across the world. It is far past time to respect and uphold the rights of Indigenous Peoples and human rights, and it is far past time to end the desecration of our common home, Earth. Global citizens must become keenly aware of the violations being perpetrated by state actors and corporations, and we must continue to demand full fossil fuel divestment now. A healthy and just world is possible, and we will continue to raise our voices and act ceaselessly until it has come to fruition.“ explained Osprey Orielle Lake (Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, WECAN)


"I am happy with DNB bank's decision to fully divest from DAPL. This proves that there is a wave of social consciousness sweeping through Norwegian financial institutions that set the global stage on what constructive dialogue looks like in terms of respecting the rights and hearing the voices of indigenous people. For every dollar spent on projects like DAPL, there are families being torn apart, voices being suppressed, military states being financed and natural resources being stripped from our future generations in the name of a fuel source that is a dying breed." explained Tanyette Colon, Activist and Filmmaker


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Photo – Indigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Norway members (left to right), Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle, Tara Houska, Michelle Cook, Autumn Chacon and Wasté Win Young


About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN) International


www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL


The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based organization established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) organization.

PRESS RELEASE - Indigenous Women of Standing Rock and Allies to Speak Out During Divestment Delegation to Norway

March 23, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                          

March 24, 2017


Media Contact:

General requests - Emily Arasim, +1(505) 920-0153, emily@wecaninternational.org

Urgent requests in Norway - Osprey Orielle Lake, +1(415) 722-2104, osprey@wecaninternational.org


Indigenous Women of Standing Rock and Allies to Speak Out

During Divestment Delegation to Norway, March 25th-April 2nd


SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, California (March 24th, 2017)A delegation of Indigenous women from Standing Rock and their allies who observed and/or experienced human rights and Indigenous rights violations in North Dakota, U.S. will travel to Norway to share on-the-ground experiences from Standing Rock and other traditional territories, as Indigenous women who are living in communities directly impacted by fossil fuel development and infrastructure.

 

Despite the termination of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) by the U.S. Trump administration, Indigenous women remain undeterred in their quest for justice and healing regarding the violations of Indigenous rights and human rights related to the on-going construction of DAPL and other fossil fuel projects.

 

From March 25th to April 2nd, 2017 theIndigenous Women’s Divestment Delegation to Norway: Experiences from Standing Rock’ will engage with financial institutions and public officials, civil society groups and public forums, and press and media to share their experiences, concerns and calls for international solidarity and justice.


All of the Delegates have been engaged on the frontline of the Standing Rock resistance effort and other work to oppose extractive developments in their homelands and to protect the natural systems of life and Indigenous rights.


Delegates include Dr. Sarah Jumping Eagle (Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota living and working on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation); Wasté Win Young (Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, Former Tribal Historic Preservation Officer); Tara Houska (Anishinaabe, tribal attorney, National Campaigns Director of Honor the Earth, and former advisor on Native American affairs to Bernie Sanders); Autumn Chacon (Diné/Navajo writer and performance artist); and Michelle Cook (Diné/Navajo, human rights lawyer and a founding member of the of the Water Protector Legal Collective at Standing Rock) - with the support of Delegation organizer Osprey Orielle Lake (Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, WECAN) and documentary filmmaker, Tanyette Colon. [Full spokes-women biographies here]


Details surrounding public and press events will be released soon. Members of the press are encouraged to reach out with questions and media requests for spokeswomen.


"In the 21st century, an investment in dated, entrenched, dirty fossil fuels is an investment against our children and our future. Indigenous peoples bear the brunt of the many harms associated with extractive industry, our communities are impacted first and worst. We must break the cycle of oil dependency and justly transition to a green economy." explains Tara Houska, Anishinaabe, tribal attorney, National Campaigns Director of Honor the Earth, former advisor on Native American affairs to Bernie Sanders


“The United States Army Corps of Engineers recently permitted the Dakota Access Pipeline, which would carry crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois, where it would hook up to other pipelines and refineries. The inevitable pipeline break on the river will result in catastrophic contamination of the water supply for 17 million people downstream, including our people. This sends a direct message that our people are expendable. Although there has been a brief respite in activity it has not stopped or deterred our people from maintaining a physical and spiritual presence on our ancestral lands. This movement has and always will be guided by prayer and love. Wóčhekiye. Wótheȟila. Wówauŋšila. Prayer. Love. Compassion. Mitakuye Oyasin. All My Relations.” explains Wasté Win Yellowlodge Young, Ihunktowanna/Hunkpapa, member the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe


"Making indigenous human rights abuses visible is critical in ending human rights abuses against Indigenous peoples. Indigenous women deserve spaces where they can share their personal testimonies regarding the impacts of extractive industries on their lands, lives, bodies, and human rights. This delegation provides the rare opportunity, for Indigenous women to meet face to face with the international banks who fund the DAPL and oil and gas extraction in their traditional territories." explains Michelle Cook, Diné (Navajo) human rights lawyer and founding member of the Water Protector Legal Collective at Standing Rock


"The connections between who we are as Lakota Oyate - our health, our lands and water, our spirituality, our self-empowerment and self-esteem - are deeply rooted; the actions we take to protect our land and water, our future, and our children's water can only help us all. We all have the power - wowasake - within us to make a difference in this world." explains Dr. Sara Jumping Eagle, Oglala Lakota and Mdewakantonwan Dakota living and working on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation


"In North Dakota when we attempt to sit down and have meetings with the bank, or the executives of the project affecting us, the doors will be locked before we even get to the building. The police will be called, we are threatened with arrest. What options are we then left with?" explains Autumn Chacon, artist, activist and Water Protector


“Indigenous women are the foundation, backbone and future of their tribal nations and now more than ever, it is essential to listen to the struggles and solutions of frontline women. We stand in solidarity with the Indigenous women delegates from the Standing Rock resistance effort as they raise their voices in Norway throughout this week. Concerned members of the international community whose governments and corporations are complicit in the violation of the rights of Indigenous Peoples, human rights, and Earth rights must be made aware of the devastations being carried out in their names across the world. Together, with voices of Indigenous women at the forefront, we can restore the health of our communities, transition to clean energy, and build the just world we seek.” explains Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN)


"While in Standing Rock bearing witness a few months ago and documenting Indigenous women, one interview that pierced my soul was that of a 13 year old from the Standing Rock Sioux.  I asked her," What would you tell Norway if you had the opportunity to speak to them?" She said, "Please know that my people have suffered and if you still continue to invest here I would say, "Have you no heart?" explains Tanyette Colon Activist and Documentarian


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About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) organization.

PRESS RELEASE - Women for Climate Justice To Raise Their Voices at the Women’s March on Washington

January 18, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 18th, 2017


Media Contact:


Emily Arasim, Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org


Women for Climate Justice To Raise Their Voices at the Women’s March on Washington


WASHINGTON, D.C. (January 18, 2017) –  On Saturday January 21, 2017, the day after the inauguration of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, hundreds of thousands of women are expected to gather in Washington D.C. and hundreds of cities across the U.S. and the world.  They will march together as part of the historic Women’s March on Washington while standing up for their rights, and the safety and health of their families and communities.


As part of the Washington D.C. March, a coalition of diverse women's groups, climate justice leaders and individuals will unite and march as 'Women for Climate Justice', sending a clear message to the new U.S. Administration that women are gravely concerned about the accelerating impacts of climate change, and the implications of a U.S. Administration that promotes climate skepticism, advancement of fossil fuels, extractive economics, racism, bigotry and sexist oppression.


The Women for Climate Justice Contingent is organizing in a decentralized manner via social media, and encouraging women to organize locally at Sister Marches across the U.S. and around the world under the banner of ‘Women for Climate Justice’.


“On January 21st, and everyday into the future until just solutions to the social and ecological crises we face are implemented - women will rise to protect and heal the Earth and our communities. In the face of a Trump presidency, we renew and strengthen our calls for urgent action to stop the exploitation of the Earth and its diverse peoples. We repudiate the rule of the fossil fuel industry, and demand that the U.S. government respect climate science and immediately work toward a just transition to a renewable energy future. We refuse to allow the next U.S. administration to decimate the lives of future generations, and the very web of life itself. We march to declare our intent to forge ahead for women’s rights, racial justice, immigration rights and environmental justice because we will not be compromised and we are unstoppable in our pursuit. We march with resolute strength, and in solidarity with our frontline, women of color and Indigenous allies, who are simultaneously experiencing the worst impacts of climate change and social injustices, and leading the way towards the just and healthy world we seek.” - Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director, Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, International (WECAN)


“Our ONE MOTHER, the Earth, is calling her children to speak on her behalf.  She who has nurtured and sustained all life is suffering from the effects of man's greed.  She calls for us to raise our voices on behalf of  the generations to come; on behalf of the Silent Ones. Sacred Water, Air and Relatives with roots, fins, wings and the four legged all need our help. We must walk in prayer to uplift the message of peace and oneness. To speak for the voiceless. For all our Relations.” - Casey Camp Horinek, Ponca Nation Tribal Councilwoman, Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network Board member


“The reality of climate change demands immediate action by the United States to cut emissions, invest in protecting our water, land and air, and put an end to the era of fossil fuels. We as women in all of our diversity stand together, more determined than ever, to call for a just transition towards a renewable energy future, an intersectional approach in all climate actions, and gender-responsive climate policy and action. We will never give up - We will continue to advocate for a healthy and peaceful planet, today and every day.” - Bridget Burns, Co-Director, Women’s Environment and Development Organization (WEDO)

 

"As women are the keepers of seeds, fire, water, life, women now are called to be the keepers of truth.  We refuse to drown in the wave of climate lies coming from an administration profiting from pollution. Collectively, we are growing a resistance that weaves many movements and draws from the valor of the many women that upheld truth before us. From Standing Rock to the Richmond refineries women are leading and protecting their homes." - Angela Adrar, Climate Justice Alliance


“Women’s rights are human rights, and key human rights are the ability to breathe clean air, drink clean water and live in a safe climate. Climate disruption endangers these rights for women across the globe. For women, when climate catastrophes hit, they hit hard. We can’t have climate justice without gender justice. Gender equity is key to everyone’s ability to thrive in the face of climate disruption. We see this work as more urgent than ever with Donald Trump as President of the United States. The Sierra Club will continue to fight for a future where all are able to lead healthy lives free from the effects of climate disruption.” - A. Tianna Scozzaro, Director, Gender, Equity and Environment Program, Sierra Club


"As our country, our rights, our bodies, sacred lands, communities, and our children are under attack by the incoming U.S. government administration, we come together as women, mothers, sisters, daughters and allies to call for climate justice, respect for our rights and Mother Earth. Justice for our climate, means justice for indigenous and frontline communities who are at the forefront of leading the resistance to the expansion of the fossil fuel industry from Richmond, CA to the Amazon rainforest. We must stand with them and we must continue to promote positive visions for the future we want for our future generations and for all life on earth. We will not stand by idly as our government is taken over by climate deniers who threaten all we hold dear. This is our time!” - Leila Salazar-López, Executive Director, Amazon Watch


“In the ‘60s it was often said that ‘Women Hold up Half the Sky.’”  However, as far as climate disruption goes, women are holding down well more than half of the responsibility of dealing with negative and dangerous consequences of climate disasters.  And, on the positive side, they are more than equally represented in forging climate solutions around the world.  From the most local grassroots efforts, to the creation of global policy, women are active, engaged and determined to continue our work towards an end to the fossil fuel era with rapid implementation of 100% renewables, energy efficiency and conservation at every level.  We will not let the incoming administration take women backwards to a world economy based on pollution for corporate profits.  We will campaign for safe energy and for a solar economy that brings justice for all.  No matter what obstacles they may send our way, we will never give up on our Beautiful Planet.” - Claire Greensfelder, Director, INOCHI/Women for Safe Energy

 

“Our job is to shift the system toward justice, sustainability, and a vibrantly healthy future for the next 7 generations.  And that job was made explicitly clear last November. The beautiful and sacred system of life that has evolved on Mother Earth for millions of years is being threatened by the corporate and political decision makers as the unnatural result of capitalism.  Capitalism assumes an infinite system, but we live on a finite planet with limited resources and Mother Earth does not negotiate.  What are we to do?  As the Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty of 2015 states, "WE STAND TOGETHER".  And, at this time, it is literally vital that we stand together to join our struggles, to support one another, to be fearless and strong and kind to one another.  So, as you look around, I ask that you look with love in your hearts and understand that this is our community, this is our strength, these are the ones who will stand with you, and we are the ones we've been waiting for.  Be brave, be strong, be fearless, be love.  Future generations are depending on us.” - Pennie Opal Plant, Co-Founder, Movement Rights & Idle No More SF Bay and signer of the Indigenous Women of the Americas Defending Mother Earth Treaty of 2015

 

“Climate change wreaks havoc on our health-from weather disasters to civil war in Syria. It is a human right to have clean water, clean air and freedom from environmental threats. Women are calling for action to reduce fossil fuels the primary cause of climate change which also contaminates our water and air. This administration must not roll back the Paris Treaty or any other healthy solutions to address climate change.” - Catherine Thomasson, MD and former Executive Director, Physicians for Social Responsibility


“Idle No More SF Bay, joins indigenous communities and so many others, as we stand for clean air, water and healthy soil.  Our mission is to nonviolently and creatively do all we can to ensure the future of the coming generations by mitigating the climate chaos caused by corporate extreme energy (fossil fuels, nuclear, etc.), saving our sacred seeds, and stopping the nuclear industry. We are for reciprocal, just and caring relationships with all forms of life.  We are led by Indigenous grandmothers, who have worked very hard to model indigenous leadership in the process of building coalitions across diverse communities.  We work toward a just transition toward a vibrantly healthy world that is respectful of all life. Not only have we found that this resonates with the society and culture that we have been building, it's also extremely effective.  While we acknowledge the legacy of genocide, colonization, enslavement, misogyny, and xenophobia and their impacts on our generations, we stand firmly on our  legacy of original instructions and indigenous values as we walk toward the way of life that promotes healing and well-being for all our relations.  We understand that as we work to heal Mother Earth, we are also healed. We stand with all of our relatives at this time with love in hearts and nonviolence in our actions for all we hold dear.” - Idle No More SF Bay

 
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JOIN OUR TEAM: WECAN Seeking Social Media/Web Intern

January 17, 2017

The Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is seeking a Social Media/Web Intern to join a dynamic team of global women working for climate justice, systemic change and women's leadership in climate change solutions. The Social Media/Web Intern will work under the guidance of WECAN's Communications Coordinator to contribute to storytelling and advocacy through weekly social media research, planning and scheduling. Secondary tasks may include creating memes, flyers and visual content, and contributing to the WECAN blog. The ideal candidate will also be interested in supporting WECAN through basic video editing and production.

Objectives:

  • Keep a regular drumbeat of social media communications (Twitter and Facebook) through weekly social media newsourcing, planning and management

  • Strengthen and build upon WECAN’s social media strategy

  • Support the messaging of our environmental and climate justice allies 


  • Build strategy to increase WECANs fans and followers and drive traffic to our website and social media pages

  • Develop and identify innovative messaging ideas

  • Create memes, flyers and visual content

  • Contribute to WECAN blogs

  • Work on video editing & production (prefered but not required)

Required Qualifications:

  • Previous experience managing social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, ect.) for a professional cause

  • Creative eye for design and messaging

  • Background and active interest in issues of climate change, climate justice, women's rights, Indigenous rights and sovereignty, global activism, international climate policy and community organizing

  • Willingness to dedicate personal time to expanding understanding of critical climate justice themes and messaging

  • Bachelors degree, current enrollment in college or university OR equivalent experience

  • Excellent writing skills and an enjoyment of writing 

  • Highly self-motivated and passionate about climate change 

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Ability to make 'meme' images, flyers and other dynamic visual content

  • Basic knowledge of video editing and ability to create short videos

  • Previous experience working for an environmentally focused/ climate justice non-profit

  • Diverse life experiences

Internship Details:

  • This is an unpaid internship - WECAN is willing to work with your institution to satisfy credit requirements, volunteer hours, etc.

  • 10-12 hours per week, scheduled flexibly and to meet your needs.

  • This is a remote position which may be carried out independently from any location. WECAN's Executive Director is based in California, USA on Pacific Time - preference will thus be given to applicants living and working in a time zone that will facilitate easy communication between team members 

  • Interns are expected to have their own reliable computer, internet access, etc.

  • Minimum commitment is 4 months, though the ideal candidate will be available for 6 months

  • Application DEADLINE: February 17, 2017 - start date is flexible but ASAP

All applications are due by Febuary 17, 2017 - please send a cover letter, resume and references to emily@wecaninternational.org for consideration.

TOOLKIT - Women for Climate Justice at the Women's March on Washington

January 12, 2017

Click here to download the full 'Women for Climate Justice at the Women's March on Washington' TOOLKIT - including meet-up logistics, inspiring images, sample chants, sign making suggestions and more.

We encourage allies marching with us in Washington D.C and at Sister Marches across the world to tailor this kit to your needs!

Learn more about marching with WECAN and Women for Climate Justice in D.C. here.

WECAN Seeking Research Intern

January 10, 2017
The Women's Earth and Climate Action Network is seeking a research intern to join a dynamic team of women working for climate justice, systemic change and women's leadership in climate change solutions. The Research Intern will work remotely, under the guidance of WECAN's Communications Coordinator and Executive Director to conduct pointed research, data collection, background analysis, summary writing, and data upload as part of the Women Speak research team. 
 

Required Qualifications:

 

  • Confident and thorough research skills
  • Developed background and active interest in issues of climate change, climate justice, women's rights, activism, international policy and community organizing; Knowledge of intersectionality of issues such as climate justice, environmental racism, women’s rights, Indigenous rights 
  • Willingness to dedicate personal time to expanding understanding of critical climate justice themes and WECAN frameworks and programs
  • Bachelors degree, current enrollment in university OR equivalent experience
  • Strong writing skills and an enjoyment of writing 
  • Highly self-motivated
  • Great organization and attention to detail

 

Preferred Qualifications:

 

  • Previous experience working for an environmentally focused /climate justice/social justice non-profit

 

Internship Details:

 

  • 10 hours per week
  • This is an unpaid internship - WECAN is willing to work with institutions/schools to satisfy credit requirements, volunteer hours, etc.
  • This is a remote position which may be carried out independently from any location. 
  • Interns are expected to have their own reliable computer, internet access, etc.
  • Minimum commitment is 4 months 
  • Start date is flexible, but preference will be given to applicants able to begin as soon as possible

All applications will be accepted on a rolling basis, please apply as soon as possible by sending a cover letter, resume and references to emily@wecaninternational.org for consideration.