Women's Earth & Climate Action Network, International
The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network is a solutions-based, multi-faceted effort established to engage women worldwide to take action as powerful stakeholders in climate change and sustainability solutions. For Our Earth and Future Generations A project of Women's Earth and Climate Caucus and its partner eraGlobal Alliance

News from 2016

PRESS RELEASE - Global Women for Climate Justice to Speak Out at COP22 Side Event and Press Conference November 16

November 15, 2016
 

MEDIA ADVISORY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 15, 2016

 

Contact:

Emily Arasim

Communications Coordinator

Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org

 

Global Women for Climate Justice to Speak Out at COP22 Side Event and Press Conference November 16

 

MARRAKECH, Morocco (November 15, 2016) – On November 16, global women leaders will unite to speak out for social and ecologic justice during a side event and press conference to be presented by the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International inside of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP22 in Marrakech.

 

Women have always been on the frontlines of environmental degradation and climate change, now it is time for them to be at the forefront of all policymaking and action to address the climate crisis. During this dynamic COP22 press conference and side event – frontline, Indigenous and grassroots women leaders from around the world will speak out and share their experiences, calls to action and solutions to address climate change and intertwined violations of human, Indigenous, women and Earth rights.

 

Live audio from the side event will be available here.

 

PRESS CONFERENCE -  Women for Climate Justice Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change

 

WHEN: November 16th, 2016 from 15:00 - 15:30

WHERE: Press Conference Room Dakhla, COP22 Blue Zone

WHO:

Thilmeeza Hussain - Former Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives; Climate Wise Women Representative; Voice of Women Founder, The Maldives

Alicia Cahuiya - Vice President of the Huaorani Nationality, Ecuador

Neema Namadamu - Founder of SAFECO, Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network Coordinator in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Ruth Nyambura - African Eco-Feminists Collective; No REDD in Africa Network Representative; Fellow of the Health of Mother Earth Foundation, Kenya

Osprey Orielle Lake - Executive Director of the Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network, USA

HOW: U.N. accreditation is required to attend this event, no registration is needed

 

SIDE EVENT - Women for Climate Justice Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change

 

WHEN: November 16, 2016 from 16:45 - 18:15

WHERE: Press Conference Room Dakhla, COP22 Blue Zone

WHO:

Thilmeeza Hussain - Former Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives; Climate Wise Women; Voice of Women, The Maldives

Neema Namadamu - Founder of SAFECO, Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network Coordinator in the Democratic Republic of Congo

Precious Phiri - Representative of Regeneration International; EarthWisdom, Zimbabwe

Carmen Capriles -  Founder of Reacción Climática, Bolivia

Blanca Chancosa - Abya Yala Women Messengers, Otavalo, Ecuador

Cecilia Flores - Abya Yala Women Messengers, Aymara, Chile

Osprey Orielle Lake - Executive Director of the Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network, USA

HOW: U.N. accreditation is required to attend this event, no registration is needed

Live audio from the side event will be available here.

 

Event speakers and Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network spokeswomen are available for media inquiries on the ground and via phone and email.

 
####

PRESS RELEASE - Global Women Leaders To Speak Out For Climate Change Action and Justice At Public Event During the United Nations COP22 Climate Talks

November 13, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 3, 2016

 

Contact:

Emily Arasim

Communications Coordinator

Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org

Global Women Leaders To Speak Out For Climate Change Action and Justice

At Public Event During the United Nations COP22 Climate Talks

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, California (November 3, 2016) – On November 14, 2016, women leaders from across the world will join together to share their struggles, experiences and solutions to the climate change crisis; speak out in resistance to false climate solutions; and present the diverse strategies and visions with which they are working to shape a healthy and equitable world.

Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Marrakech’ is a free, public event organized by the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International, to be held in downtown Marrakesh, Morocco during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP22 climate talks.

Included in the discussion during ‘Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Marrakech’ will be vital topics such as Indigenous rights; the connection between gender and environment; rights of nature; frontline environmental movements; and women’s leadership and calls for immediate climate action within a climate justice framework.

Policy makers and international advocates will speak alongside grassroots, Indigenous, grassroots and frontline women leaders from around the world. The event will be opened with traditional music of the Tamazight peoples, and highlight the voices and work of African and Moroccan women leaders, alongside diverse women allies from South America, North America, Europe and global Island Nations.

Speakers to date include Her Excellency President Hilda Heine (President of the Republic of the Marshall Islands); Honorable Mary Robinson (Mary Robinson Foundation: Climate Justice, Former President of Ireland);  Neema Namadamu (SAFECO, Women's Earth and Climate Action Network Democratic Republic of Congo); Rachida Outouchki and Amina El Hajjami (Tamazight Representatives of the High Atlas Foundation, Morocco); Ruth Nyambura (African Eco-Feminists Collective, No REDD in Africa Network, Health of Mother Earth Foundation, Kenya); Simone Lovera (Global Forest Coalition, Paraguay); Diana Lopez (Southwest Workers’ Union; Global Grassroots Justice Alliance, USA); Thilmeeza Hussain (Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives, Climate Wise Women, Voice of Women, Maldives); Jacqui Patterson (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Environmental and Climate Justice Program, USA);  Kalyani Raj (UNFCCC Women and Gender Constituency Representative, India); Marta Cecilia Ventura ( Abya Yala Women Messengers, Mayan People of Quiche, Guatemala); Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner (Climate Change Activist / Poet, Marshall Islands); Southern Africa Rural Women's Assembly RepresentativeGloria Ushiga (to be confirmed, ASHIÑWAKA Association of Sapara Women of Ecuador); and Osprey Orielle Lake (Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, USA).

“Across the world, women stand on the frontlines of climate change impacts, and it is far past time for them to be at the center of all climate policy and action plans. Throughout COP22, we are standing strong to bring the voices of frontline, Indigenous and grassroots to the forefront where they belong. On November 14th, we united to speak out with the conviction that real forward movement to address climate change and meet the demands of the Paris Climate Agreement depends upon the full and equal participation of women, and that the urgent solutions required at this time will come from women taking action for social and environmental justice at the local, national, and international level. Women are experiencing climate impacts first and worst, and through these challenges hold the tools to confront injustice and build the world we seek.” stated Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

“Women around the world are passionate about addressing Climate Change. In DR Congo, we wage our war on the front lines in the most primitive conditions – without hoses or running water (having to carry water in buckets) to water our nurseries, no boots, no gloves, no back braces (but maybe a baby on our back)…There is no border for Climate Change, just like there is no border for oxygen. The damages and benefits we create are global….That is why everyone must put their back into the work. Women on the frontlines of this war deserve better support. We speak for Climate Justice, and we stand for justice for the Maman Shujaa (Hero Women) who are fighting on the frontlines to combat climate change on behalf of the whole world.” stated Neema Namdamu, Founder and Director of SAFECO and Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network Democratic Republic of Congo Coordinator

“This fight is not between the rich and the poor, nor between the developed countries and the developing countries this is a fight between people who are willing to act on climate and those who refuse to act, those who are willing to speak out and those who choose to stay silent. And if we choose later, we won't be leaving our children with a planet that is livable.” stated Thilmeeza Hussain, Former Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives; Human Rights and Climate Activist & Educator; Representative of Climate Wise Women and Founder of Voice of Women, Maldives

 

“Women play a vital role in community initiatives that contribute to the conservation and restoration of forests and other ecosystems, but regretfully current climate finance mechanisms tend to prioritize large-scale ecologically damaging projects like monoculture tree plantations rather than community-driven conservation initiatives that contribute to climate mitigation and resilience. Profound reforms are necessary to ensure climate policies and climate finance provide more appropriate and effective support to community conservation." stated Simone Lovera, Executive Director of the Global Forest Coalition, Paraguay

 

Event speakers and WECAN spokeswomen are available for interviews on the ground in Marrakech or remotely.
 

 

###

About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. WECAN unites women globally for mobilizations, just solutions, and worldwide movement building. Work includes the International Women’s Earth and Climate Summit, Women’s Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women’s Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women for Forests, US Women’s Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) 

PRESS RELEASE - COP22: Global Women Leaders To Speak Out For Climate Change Action and Justice At Public Event During the United Nations Climate Talks

November 03, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

November 3, 2016

Contact:

Emily Arasim

Communications Coordinator, Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org

Global Women Leaders To Speak Out For Climate Change Action and Justice

At Public Event During the United Nations COP22 Climate Talks

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, California (November 3, 2016) – On November 14, 2016, women leaders from across the world will join together to share their struggles, experiences and solutions to the climate change crisis; speak out in resistance to false climate solutions; and present the diverse strategies and visions with which they are working to shape a healthy and equitable world.

Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Marrakech’ is a free, public event organized by the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International, to be held in downtown Marrakesh, Morocco during the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP22 climate talks.

Included in the discussion during ‘Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Marrakech’ will be vital topics such as Indigenous rights; the connection between gender and environment; rights of nature; frontline environmental movements; and women’s leadership and calls for immediate climate action within a climate justice framework.

Policy makers and international advocates will speak alongside grassroots, Indigenous, grassroots and frontline women leaders from around the world. The event will be opened with traditional music of the Tamazight peoples, and highlight the voices and work of African and Moroccan women leaders, alongside diverse women allies from South America, North America, Europe and global Island Nations.

Speakers to date include Her Excellency President Hilda Heine (President of the Republic of the Marshall Islands); Honorable Mary Robinson (Mary Robinson Foundation: Climate Justice, Former President of Ireland);  Neema Namadamu (SAFECO, Women's Earth and Climate Action Network Democratic Republic of Congo); Rachida Outouchki and Amina El Hajjami (Tamazight Representatives of the High Atlas Foundation, Morocco); Ruth Nyambura (African Eco-Feminists Collective, No REDD in Africa Network, Health of Mother Earth Foundation, Kenya); Simone Lovera (Global Forest Coalition, Paraguay); Diana Lopez (Southwest Workers’ Union; Global Grassroots Justice Alliance, USA); Thilmeeza Hussain (Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives, Climate Wise Women, Voice of Women, Maldives); Jacqui Patterson (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Environmental and Climate Justice Program, USA);  Kalyani Raj (UNFCCC Women and Gender Constituency Representative, India); Marta Cecilia Ventura ( Abya Yala Women Messengers, Mayan People of Quiche, Guatemala); Kathy Jetñil-Kijiner (Climate Change Activist / Poet, Marshall Islands); Southern Africa Rural Women's Assembly RepresentativeGloria Ushiga (to be confirmed, ASHIÑWAKA Association of Sapara Women of Ecuador); and Osprey Orielle Lake (Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, USA).

“Across the world, women stand on the frontlines of climate change impacts, and it is far past time for them to be at the center of all climate policy and action plans. Throughout COP22, we are standing strong to bring the voices of frontline, Indigenous and grassroots to the forefront where they belong. On November 14th, we united to speak out with the conviction that real forward movement to address climate change and meet the demands of the Paris Climate Agreement depends upon the full and equal participation of women, and that the urgent solutions required at this time will come from women taking action for social and environmental justice at the local, national, and international level. Women are experiencing climate impacts first and worst, and through these challenges hold the tools to confront injustice and build the world we seek.” stated Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

“Women around the world are passionate about addressing Climate Change. In DR Congo, we wage our war on the front lines in the most primitive conditions – without hoses or running water (having to carry water in buckets) to water our nurseries, no boots, no gloves, no back braces (but maybe a baby on our back)…There is no border for Climate Change, just like there is no border for oxygen. The damages and benefits we create are global….That is why everyone must put their back into the work. Women on the frontlines of this war deserve better support. We speak for Climate Justice, and we stand for justice for the Maman Shujaa (Hero Women) who are fighting on the frontlines to combat climate change on behalf of the whole world.” stated Neema Namdamu, Founder and Director of SAFECO and Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network Democratic Republic of Congo Coordinator

“This fight is not between the rich and the poor, nor between the developed countries and the developing countries this is a fight between people who are willing to act on climate and those who refuse to act, those who are willing to speak out and those who choose to stay silent. And if we choose later, we won't be leaving our children with a planet that is livable.” stated Thilmeeza Hussain, Former Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives; Human Rights and Climate Activist & Educator; Representative of Climate Wise Women and Founder of Voice of Women, Maldives

“Women play a vital role in community initiatives that contribute to the conservation and restoration of forests and other ecosystems, but regretfully current climate finance mechanisms tend to prioritize large-scale ecologically damaging projects like monoculture tree plantations rather than community-driven conservation initiatives that contribute to climate mitigation and resilience. Profound reforms are necessary to ensure climate policies and climate finance provide more appropriate and effective support to community conservation." stated Simone Lovera, Executive Director of the Global Forest Coalition, Paraguay

Event speakers and WECAN spokeswomen are available for interviews on the ground in Marrakech or remotely.
 

 

###

Photo 1: Thilmeeza Hussain, Former Deputy Ambassador to the UN from the Maldives; Human Rights and Climate Activist & Educator; Representative of Climate Wise Women and Founder of Voice of Women, Maldives speaks at a WECAN International event during COP21 Paris. Photo by Sophie Pinchetti

Photo 2: Neema Namadamu of SAFECO and WECAN DR Congo speaks inside the United Nations during COP21 in Paris – Photo by Emily Arasim

 

About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. WECAN unites women globally for mobilizations, just solutions, and worldwide movement building. Work includes the International Women’s Earth and Climate Summit, Women’s Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women’s Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women for Forests, US Women’s Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) 

PRESS RELEASE - Women Unite Globally for Ten Days of Action for Climate Justice and Solutions Before COP22 Climate Talks

October 27, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 27, 2016

 

Emily Arasim, Communications Coordinator

Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org

 

Juliana Uribe, Campaign Liaison

Women’s Global Call for Climate Justice

+1 (303) 956-6022  

juliana@wedo.org

Women Unite Globally for Ten Days of Action for

Climate Justice and Solutions Before COP22 Climate Talks

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, Calif., October 27, 2016- Beginning tomorrow, women and girls from around the world will raise their voices and take action to highlight the dire climate change impacts they are facing; demonstrate their solutions and strategies to address the climate crisis; and share their messages to world governments and United Nations officials gathering for the UNFCCC COP22 Morocco climate talks.

Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization’ is a decentralized action campaign happening in communities around the world from October 28th to November 6, 2016. Women will share photos and messages, and take action to resist environmental and social degradation; spotlight local climate change impacts; demand change from unjust social, economic and development systems; and demonstrate the many effective, just and safe climate solutions, strategies and political calls that are being implemented by women and girls around the world on a daily basis.

Diverse exemplifying photos and statements will be available on an online Action Gallery, woven together across social media and news platforms worldwide, and shared as part of events on the ground in Morocco during COP22.

Many women will also organize actions such as town-hall or village meetings, vigils and demonstrations, rallies, sit-ins, marches, educational events, art projects, and other events and statements to showcase the local climate struggles and solutions of women leaders and their communities.

The ‘Women Act for Climate Justice’ mobilization will demonstrate the collective actions and voices of global women and girls in the lead up to COP22, but also far beyond the UNFCCC in Morocco.

“The system that undermines indigenous peoples’ rights and exacerbate gender inequalities is the very same that fuels the climate crisis, namely the unfettered capitalist system that considers growth as the unique legitimate objective. In the lead up of COP 22, women are demanding fair, ambitious and sustainable rules for the implementation of the Paris agreement, including the drastic reduction of production and consumption patterns in industrialised countries, the promotion of decentralised, gender-sensitive and locally-driven economies, the respect of the right to free prior informed consent of indigenous peoples and the immediate halt of the negotiations of free trade agreements that put climate policies and other social considerations at risk.” stated Alma Sinumlag, member of the Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD), Philippines

“From Fiji to Haiti, from Australia to the DR Congo and everywhere in between - women are standing up to demand that their voices for climate justice and systemic change are brought to the forefront of all climate change policymaking and implementation programs. Around the world, women face the impacts of the climate change first and worst, yet simultaneously, hold the keys to meaningful, equitable and effective climate solutions that are commensurate with the escalating crisis we face. With the voices of Indigenous, grassroots and frontline women leading the way, this October 28-November 6, we rise to decry environmental devastation and intertwined social violation, while taking action to show that the just, equitable and healthy world we seek is attainable, and on its way through the work and vision of women for climate justice around the world.” stated Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

“Women and girls and our communities around Fiji and the Pacific are mobilising for the 10 days of global action from October 28 to November 6 2016!From urban areas to rural villages and remote settlements in small islands, we are coming together with women from every region to say, NO MORE! No more damage to our Commons, no more sand mining ruining ancient and culturally significant sand dunes that protect us from the rising waves. No more selling precious water to rich people overseas. No more false carbon trading solutions. Most of all, we want right now to affirm the roles, strategies and rising strength of women defenders of the Commons, and women human rights defenders. We are working together, in all our diversities as never before. Adi Finau Tabakaucoro of Nai i Soqosoqo Vakamarama i Taukei, Fiji’s oldest women’s network   said, “Climate justice means that we must all save and protect our environment. If others are being irresponsible about the Commons, let us help to make them make responsible decisions.. We must act quickly, and together.” stated Noelene Nabulivou, DIVA for Equality, and Pacific Partnerships on Gender, Climate Change and Sustainable Development (PPGCCSD), Fiji.

"As women, we call to the Bolivian Government and all world governments to stop looking for oil and hydrocarbons in indigenous territories without previous informed consent and consultation processes, and to respect the traditional ways of living, and to respect ancestral territories...We call for policies that promote and implement environmental friendly energies like solar and eolic sources, and for a stop to the implementation of projects that are considered to be false solutions like nuclear and hydroelectric mega dams in the tropical forest, which increase the climatic, environmental and social crisis that we are facing." stated Carmen Capriles, Environmental Defender with Reacción Climática, Bolivia

A diverse group of ‘Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization’ spokes-women are ready to engage with press at any time.

Full details, submission portal and global action gallery available at: wecaninternational.org/womenactforclimatejustice

####

About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. WECAN unites women globally for mobilizations, just solutions, and worldwide movement building. Work includes the International Women’s Earth and Climate Summit, Women’s Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women’s Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women for Forests, US Women’s Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) organization.

About The Women’s Global Call for Climate Justice

womenclimatejustice.org

@WomenGlobalCall

The Women’s Global Call for Climate Justice is a decentralized campaign organized collectively by a group of regionally diverse women’s rights and feminist organizations, brought together by the urgent need for just action on climate change. Since its launch, the campaign has become a platform for hundreds of women’s rights organizations and thousands of women activists and allies to demand climate justice while also incorporating specific demands and themes including: Energy, Economy, Solutions, Survival, Power and Climate Justice. 

PRESS RELEASE - Women’s Voices for Climate Justice to be Highlighted by WECAN International during United Nations COP22 Climate Talks

October 10, 2016


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 10, 2016

 

Contact:

Emily Arasim

Communications Coordinator

Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org


Women’s Voices for Climate Justice to be

Highlighted by WECAN International during United Nations COP22 Climate Talks


SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, California (October 10, 2016) – As governments from around the world convene in Marrakesh, Morocco this November to work towards implementation of the Paris Climate Agreement, women from around the world will speak out to highlight the vital role of women in building urgent climate change solutions founded upon a climate justice framework, and respect for human rights, women’s rights, rights of nature and Indigenous rights.


As part of the growing global women’s movement for climate justice, the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International will be on the ground in Marrakesh during the 2016 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP22 climate talks.


Building upon WECAN International’s work and presence during UNFCCC climate talks since 2010, the organization will participate both within and outside of the climate conference to advocate for climate justice, bold action on climate change, and for the voices of grassroots, Indigenous and frontline women leaders to be at the forefront of policy, solutions and decision making.


On November 14th, the organization will present a public event in downtown Marrakech, ‘Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change – Marrakech’. During the event, women leaders from around the world and across Morocco will speak on vital topics including Indigenous rights; food security; forest and water protection; the intersection of gender and environment; and women’s leadership and calls for action within a climate justice framework. This event is free and open to the public.


On November 16th, WECAN International will hold a formal side event inside of the UNFCCC venue, focusing on frontline women’s climate solutions, to be held from 16:45 to 18:15 in the Bering room (former Observer Room 10), COP22 Blue Zone (accreditation required).


In the days immediately preceding the UNFCCC COP22 climate talks, women from around the world will take local action as part of the campaign ‘Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Day of Global Mobilization’, uplifting the stories of climate impact and solutions in their community; showing women’s central role as Earth guardians; and making clear their demands for systemic change and climate justice.


“WECAN International is committed to bringing the voices of grassroots, frontline and Indigenous women to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change so they can speak for themselves as powerful land, forest and water defenders and protectors, ” explained Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network. “Women around the world are demonstrating resistance to the false solutions to the climate crisis too often put forth in our national and international institutions, and at the same time women are offering clear directives for real action from a climate justice framework to rebuild the healthy world we seek. Women are taking bold action in advance of and during the COP22 climate negotiations and every single day thereafter until we find justice and healing for our communities and the Earth.”


Updates forthcoming on press conferences to be hosted in Morocco by the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network and allies.


Information on all WECAN actions and events during the UNFCCC COP22 available at: http://wecaninternational.org/pages/cop22


###


About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL


The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. WECAN unites women globally for mobilizations, just solutions, and worldwide movement building. Work includes the International Women’s Earth and Climate Summit, Women’s Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women’s Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women for Forests, US Women’s Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) organization.

PRESS RELEASE - Women's Voices for Climate Justice to be Highlighted by WECAN International during United Nations COP22 Climate Talks

October 10, 2016
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 10, 2016
 
Contact:
Emily Arasim
Communications Coordinator
Women's Earth and Climate Action Network

Women's Voices for Climate Justice to be Highlighted
 by WECAN International during United Nations COP22 Climate Talks

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, California (October 10, 2016) - As governments from around the world convene in Marrakech, Morocco this November to work towards implementation of the Paris Climate Agreement, women from around the world will speak out to highlight the vital role of women in building urgent climate change solutions founded upon a climate justice framework, and respect for human rights, women's rights, rights of nature and Indigenous rights.

As part of the growing global women's movement for climate justice, the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International will be on the ground in Marrakech, Morocco during the 2016 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) COP22 climate talks.

Building upon WECAN International's work and presence during UNFCCC climate talks since 2010, the organization will participate both within and outside of the climate conference to advocate for climate justice, bold action on climate change, and for the voices of grassroots, Indigenous and frontline women leaders to be at the forefront of policy, solutions and decision making.

On November 14th, the organization will present a public event in downtown Marrakech, 'Women Leading Solutions on the Frontlines of Climate Change - Marrakech'. During the event, women leaders from around the world and across Morocco will speak on vital topics including Indigenous rights; food security; forest and water protection; the intersection of gender and environment; and women's leadership and calls for action within a climate justice framework. This event is free and open to the public.

On November 16th, WECAN International will hold a formal side event inside of the UNFCCC venue, focusing on frontline women's climate solutions, to be held from 16:45 to 18:15 in the Bering room (former Observer Room 10), COP22 Blue Zone (accreditation required).

In the days immediately preceding the UNFCCC COP22 climate talks, women from around the world will take local action as part of the campaign 'Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Day of Global Mobilization', uplifting the stories of climate impact and solutions in their community; showing women's central role as Earth guardians; and making clear their demands for systemic change and climate justice.

"WECAN International is committed to bringing the voices of grassroots, frontline and Indigenous women to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change so they can speak for themselves as powerful land, forest and water defenders and protectors, " explained Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network. "Women around the world are demonstrating resistance to the false solutions to the climate crisis too often put forth in our national and international institutions, and at the same time women are offering clear directives for real action from a climate justice framework to rebuild the healthy world we seek. Women are taking bold action in advance of and during the COP22 climate negotiations and every single day thereafter until we find justice and healing for our communities and the Earth."

Updates forthcoming on press conferences to be hosted in Morocco by the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network and allies.

Information on all WECAN actions and events during the UNFCCC COP22 available at: wecaninternational.org/pages/cop22

###

About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN) International
@WECAN_INTL

The Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. WECAN unites women globally for mobilizations, just solutions, and worldwide movement building. Work includes the International Women's Earth and Climate Summit, Women's Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women's Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women for Forests, US Women's Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women's Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) organization.

PRESS RELEASE - Worldwide Women Mobilize for Climate Justice Before COP22 Climate Talks

September 28, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 28, 2016

 

Emily Arasim, Communications Coordinator

Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org

 

Juliana Uribe, Campaign Liaison

Women’s Global Call for Climate Justice

+1 (303) 956-6022  

juliana@wedo.org

 

Worldwide Women Mobilize for Climate Justice Before COP22 Climate Talks

 

SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA, Calif., September 28, 2016  - One month from now, global women and girls will organize together for the ‘Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization’, raising their voices and taking action to resist environmental and social degradation; highlight the climate impacts their communities are facing; demand change from unjust social, economic and development systems; and demonstrate the many effective, just and safe climate solutions, strategies and political calls that are being implemented by women and girls around the world on a daily basis.

 

Local, national, regional and global environmental, social justice, women’s human rights and Indigenous collectives, civil society organizations and social movements are committed to action across the world, and will share photos, videos, statements and action stories on an open online gallery for 10 days from October 28th to November 6th, 2016. This is a decentralized mobilization that demonstrates women-led, women human rights defender, feminist and climate activism everywhere and encourages strong, diverse local action.


The 2016 ‘Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization’ campaign is happening just before the November 2016 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) - COP22 Conference in Marrakech, Morocco, where women leaders are committed to working together to ensure a sustained civil society and social movement presence and pressure to demand that all government road maps ahead originate in a climate justice framework, and with respect to human, Indigenous and women’s rights - and gender, social, economic and ecological justice. The ‘Women Act for Climate Justice’ mobilization will show the collective actions and voices of global women and girls in the lead up to COP22, but also far beyond the UNFCCC.

 

Participants in the mobilization will share photos and statements about the dire climate impacts their communities are facing, local and national resistance and strategies for change, and their messages to each other, world governments and the UN system in advance of the Morocco climate talks. Many will also organize vital town-hall or village meetings, vigils and demonstrations, rallies, sit-ins, marches, educational events, art projects, and other actions and statements to showcase local struggles and solutions by women leaders and their communities.


“Let us be clear. Our planet and all species are in serious danger, humans caused this - and our response must be substantive, urgent, and everywhere. Women, girls and local communities around the world live with daily loss and damage to societies, economies and ecological systems. We are furious and demand change. We are targeted when we defend our territories. We are seen as side events, or as victims. But we know different. Women are working to fix greedy ecocidal behaviour wherever we find it in states, corporations and IFIs among others; building local community-led strategies, and working through ever-widening resistance movements. We challenge unfair economic systems, corporatised governance, aid, trade and debt systems, bad food and water systems, false energy and technology solutions, and work to adapt to changes already upon us - including in Pacific small island states.  Our work is ongoing and after the 10 Days of global amplification, let no-one say they cannot hear. WOMEN, FEMINISTS, EVERYONE - JOIN US FOR 10 DAYS AND BEYOND. This is our collective resistance and survival struggle. Don’t give in. Rise up.”  explained Noelene Nabulivou, DIVA for Equality, and Pacific Partnerships on Gender, Climate Change and Sustainable Development (PPGCCSD), Fiji.


“Women and girls around the world are facing disproportionate climate change everyday, and are standing up to call for and implement just solutions and immediate action commensurate with the level of crisis we face. During ‘Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization’, we take action together to say ‘enough is enough’, we are here to protect and defend the web of life. Women are issuing a wake up call to the world that the time has come for bold action to address the roots of the climate crisis and socio-ecological injustices. We know that violence against the Earth and violence against women are inseparable, and we stand in solidarity with women worldwide to dismantle these violent systems of oppression and destruction, and call for climate justice. We know that often it is Indigenous and frontline women who are the ones rising to actively resist, revision and create the just world we seek , and we need to highlight their voices and act in solidarity. As the seas rise, so do the women of the world.” explained Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International.


“The Women’s Global Call for Climate Justice is about reclaiming power. We are here to say that we want to reclaim power through our voices, in the streets, in our communities, in our democracies and governments. We want to show that women, in particular women whose voices are on the frontlines of crisis and the frontlines of change but who have been left out of the frontlines of decision-making, speak truth about what we need to do to raise ambition and why the rights of women and girls, indigenous people, and human rights overall are central to all climate action to ensure climate justice. ‘Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization’ will amplify these demands and inspire collective action across the world for a just and healthy planet that we refuse to give up on!” stated Bridget Burns (Co-Director) & Juliana Velez (Projects Associate), Women’s Environment & Development Organization (WEDO), International.


“The climate crisis is fundamentally an issue of inequality; wealth inequality, as climate change is caused by the historical exploitation of the world’s resources and carbon by the wealthiest nations and individuals; and gender inequality, as patriarchal practices and gender discrimination are exacerbated by climate change. As a result, women, particularly marginalised women living in the most vulnerable countries of the Global South, are paying the highest price of a development model they haven’t benefited from. To challenge this status quo and bring about climate justice, women-led local climate justice movements need to be supported and strengthened. The ‘Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization’ will help this objective by amplifying those local women’s movements critical to address the threats and responses to climate change,” explained Titi Soentoro, Focal Point of the Climate Justice Organising Committee of the Asia Pacific Forum on Women, Law and Development (APWLD), Indonesia

 

A diverse group of ‘Women Act for Climate Justice: Ten Days of Global Mobilization’ spokes-women are ready to engage with press at any time.

 

Full details, submission portal and global action gallery available at: wecaninternational.org/womenactforclimatejustice

 

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About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN) International

www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted organization established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. WECAN unites women globally for mobilizations, just solutions, and worldwide movement building. Work includes the International Women’s Earth and Climate Summit, Women’s Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women’s Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women for Forests, US Women’s Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) organization.

About The Women’s Global Call for Climate Justice

womenclimatejustice.org

@WomenGlobalCall

The Women’s Global Call for Climate Justice is a decentralized campaign organized collectively by a group of regionally diverse women’s rights and feminist organizations, brought together by the urgent need for just action on climate change. Since its launch, the campaign has become a platform for hundreds of women’s rights organizations and thousands of women activists and allies to demand climate justice while also incorporating specific demands and themes including: Energy, Economy, Solutions, Survival, Power and Climate Justice.

PRESS RELEASE - ‘Keep it in the Ground’ Movement Delivers One Million Signatures to the White House Calling for an End to New Federal Fossil Fuel Leasing

September 16, 2016

For Immediate Release, September 15, 2016

 

Contact:  Emily Arasim, 505-920-1053, emily@wecaninternational.org

‘Keep it in the Ground’ Movement Delivers One Million Signatures to the White House Calling for an End to New Federal Fossil Fuel Leasing


Frontline, Indigenous, and climate leaders from across the U.S.

renew one-year call to end fossil fuel leasing on public lands and oceans

 

Photographs will be made available at this link: www.ran.org/kingphotos


WASHINGTON D.C. — Frontline, Indigenous and climate leaders from across the country gathered at the White House today to deliver over one million signatures calling on President Obama to stop fossil fuel lease sales on public lands and oceans. The event also marked the one-year growth of this campaign, part of the “Keep it in the Ground” movement, when more than 450 climate groups and leaders first called upon President Obama to take real climate action and end new fossil fuel leasing.


Today’s event comes as the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, ally Indigenous and other supporters wage a historic resistance against the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota to protect precious water sources; it also follows as Gulf residents are still recovering from unprecedented flooding in Louisiana and Mississippi exacerbated by climate change. Efforts like these, to protect communities from fossil fuel disasters and to rebuild them after climate catastrophe, underscore the urgent need to halt new fossil fuel development now.


Over the last year, thousands of people have turned up to peacefully challenge more than 20 federal fossil fuel auctions across the country, calling on the Obama Administration to stem further fossil fuel extraction. The quickly-growing movement caused the Administration to halt several of those sales and now to move auctions online to avoid public controversy.  

 

Ending new fossil fuel leasing on public land and oceans would keep up to 450 billion tons of potential greenhouse gas pollution in the ground—half of the potential pollution from all remaining fossil fuels in the United States.  Federal fossil fuels already leased to industry are capable of producing decades beyond the point by which the planet must transition to clean energy to avoid devastating global warming.

 

Groups participating in today’s rally include Bold Louisiana, Center for Biological Diversity, Dooda Fracking, Greenpeace, Earthworks, Environment America, Friends of the Earth, Louisiana Bucket Brigade, Progressive Leadership Alliance of Nevada, Rainforest Action Network, Resisting Environmental Destruction on Indigenous Lands, Science and Environmental Health Network, Sierra Club, Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, and WildEarth Guardians

 

Quotes from participating organizations

 

"We have joined the national Keep it in the Ground movement because it is a matter of life and death for our part of the world. South Louisiana flooded last month because our atmosphere is warm from fossil fuels. We are getting repeated wake up calls and yet we stay asleep. The time is now -- this moment -- to end federal leasing of our natural resources and keep this oil where it belongs: beneath the ground." --Anne Rolfes, founding director, Louisiana Bucket Brigade.


"As frontline Indigenous community members we have to draw the line between this cultural genocide and the corporate natural resource development procedures on tribal lands. We can no longer allow the industry to experiment on our tribal lands as we experience the dynamics of multiple impacts we have yet to process. The dynamics are too complicated even for our tribal leaders to comprehend. Without full comprehension our concerns are lingering and the industry is extracting day in and day out, while we have little to no time to react as community members."

--Kim Howe, Diné, Dooda Fracking

 

“We are standing against the fossil fuels industry in saying that whether they like it or not, their short term profits are less important than the planet we are going to leave to future generations.” --Bernie Sanders, U.S. Senator for Vermont


“Climate change is here. We're seeing record floods in the Gulf, wildfires in the west, with frontline communities bearing the brunt of this. We need real climate leadership now —  not tomorrow, not in the next administration, but today. President Obama says he wants to be a climate leader. Well he can walk the walk by taking two bold actions: End fossil fuel leases on public lands and public waters; and stop the Dakota Access Pipeline. It defies logic that these things are still happening — they fly in the face of the newly signed Paris Agreement and all the other positive things the president likes to say. It's time for him to act." --Lindsey Allen, executive director, Rainforest Action Network


"Respecting the land is a way of life among Indigenous people. Mother Earth is speaking to us through increased natural disasters and it is time all recognize Her power and ability to nourish or destroy us. Change needs to take place now to ensure there is no more destruction of the land and our people." --Kendra Pinto, community outreach, Counselor Chapter House


"I don't believe this president is done addressing climate change, especially when it comes to our public lands. He knows the government can't keep selling public land rights to oil and gas companies while ignoring climate change. We’re counting on him to step up and fix this before the clock runs out." --Tim Ream, climate and energy campaign director with WildEarth Guardians


“Together, standing as one nation we are powerful beings. Protecting the essence of life on this planet is in the interest of every single being on earth. Protectors of water are protectors of earth. Stand up and stand strong. To' be iina (Water is LIFE).” --Louise Benally, Indigenous cultural concepts, environmental-humans rights advocate, from Big Mountain, Black Mesa, Ariz.


“The Keep it in the Ground movement is growing stronger. In just one year, we have fundamentally altered the fossil fuel landscape and are having a national conversation about ending fossil fuel leasing on federally controlled lands and waters. More than one million people are demanding that President Obama use his authority to stop the leasing of fossil fuels on federal lands and water today.” --Erich Pica, executive director, Friends of the Earth

 

“We have come from across the country to deliver a powerful message to President Obama’s doorstep -- enough is enough. It is time to change our relationship with fossil fuels as a country, which means no new leases and no new pipelines, period. The people standing here today represent thousands of people across the country who are taking courageous action in their communities, people who face extraction in their backyards and those already on the frontlines of the climate crisis. This movement is here to remind our leaders that it is time for change, and we cannot wait another day.” --Diana Best, Senior Climate and Energy Campaigner, Greenpeace USA


“There is already more public fossil fuels under lease than can be safely burned. Climate change is a real and present threat, wreaking havoc right now with historic flooding in the Gulf, and drought and wildfires in the West. More than a million Americans today are telling President Obama to live up to his global climate promises by halting new fossil fuel leases now.” --Valerie Love, clean energy campaigner, Center for Biological Diversity


"In just a few short years, President Obama went from talking about an "all of the above" energy strategy to saying that we need to leave some fossil fuels in the ground. This rapid change speaks to not just the urgency needed to prevent further climate disruption, but to the power of the ‘Keep it in the Ground’ movement as well, and we will continue to work until this is policy -- not just rhetoric." --Lena Moffitt, Director of Beyond Dirty Fuels campaign, Sierra Club


“Around the world and across the U.S., the impacts of the climate crisis reveal themselves with more alarming force everyday. The stakes could not be higher – our community safety and well being, thriving natural world, economy, and the future of generations to come hang in the balance. The people have spoken - we are rising for climate justice, and we are calling for President Obama to end all new fossil fuel leases on public lands and waters, and immediately terminate plans to build the Dakota Access Pipeline. Given the administration’s recent ratification of the Paris Climate Accord, we must take these actions now, there is no later moment. The people's movement, led by Indigenous peoples, women and frontline, most-impacted communities have the solutions – and we are calling upon the President for immediate support and action with those who are envisioning and building a just and livable future."  --Osprey Orielle Lake (Executive Director, Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International)


“A corporation violates laws and destroys sacred sites, yet activists and journalists are the ones policed. Peaceful protectors are attacked by dogs and pepper sprayed. Unfortunately our government seems unwilling to fulfill its obligations to protect our fundamental rights - clean water, biodiversity, cultural heritage, a stable climate for our children. People are on the ground now fighting for these rights, for their children today and for future generations of all species. My hope and appeal to the current Administration is to join this historic moment; be the Administration that takes responsibility for global emissions, and delivers tangibly on climate justice.” --Kaitlin Butler, program director, Extreme Energy Initiative lead, Science and Environmental Health Network


"To prevent climate catastrophe, safeguard our treasured landscapes and protect our oceans, we must keep fossil fuels in the ground and transition to 100 percent clean energy. We simply can't continue to drill, mine and burn more fossil fuels while global warming passes the point of no return. To cement his climate and conservation legacy, the president should withdraw all proposals for new fracking, mining and drilling on our public lands and in our oceans." --Rachel Richardson, Stop Drilling program director, Environment America


Background

On behalf of the American people, the U.S. federal government manages nearly 650 million acres of public land and more than 1.7 billion acres of the Outer Continental Shelf — and the fossil fuels beneath them. This includes federal public land, which makes up about a third of the U.S. land area, and oceans like Alaska’s Chukchi Sea, the Gulf of Mexico and the Eastern Seaboard. These places and the fossil fuels beneath them are held in trust for the public by the federal government; federal fossil fuel leasing is administered by the Department of the Interior.

Over the past decade, the combustion of federal fossil fuels has resulted in nearly a quarter of all U.S. energy-related emissions. An 2015 report by EcoShift Consulting found that remaining federal oil, gas, coal, oil shale, and tar sands that have not been leased to industry contain up to 450 billion tons of potential greenhouse gas pollution. As of earlier this year, 67 million acres of federal fossil fuel were already leased to industry, an area more than 55 times larger than Grand Canyon National Park and containing up to 43 billion tons of potential greenhouse gas pollution. The President has the authority to end onshore and offshore fossil fuel lease sales.

Last year Sens. Merkley (D-Ore.), Sanders (I-Vt.) and others introduced the Keep It In the Ground Act (S. 2238) legislation to end new federal fossil fuel leases and cancel non-producing federal fossil fuel leases. Days later President Obama canceled the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, saying, “Because ultimately, if we’re going to prevent large parts of this Earth from becoming not only inhospitable but uninhabitable in our lifetimes, we’re going to have to keep some fossil fuels in the ground rather than burn them and release more dangerous pollution into the sky.”

Download the September “Keep It in the Ground” letter to President Obama.

Download Grounded: The Presidents Power to Fight Climate Change, Protect Public Lands by Keeping Publicly Owned Fossil Fuels in the Ground (this report details the legal authorities with which a president can halt new federal fossil fuel leases).

Download The Potential Greenhouse Gas Emissions of U.S. Federal Fossil Fuels (this report quantifies the volume and potential greenhouse gas emissions of remaining federal fossil fuels) and The Potential Greenhouse Gas Emissions fact sheet.

Download Over-leased: How Production Horizons of Already Leased Federal Fossil Fuels Outlast Global Carbon Budgets.

Download Critical Gulf: The Vital Importance of Ending Fossil Fuel Leasing in the Gulf of Mexico

Download Public Lands, Private Profits about the corporations profiting from climate-destroying fossil fuel extraction on public lands.

Download the legal petition calling on the Obama administration to halt all new offshore fossil fuel leasing.

Download the legal petition calling on the Obama administration to halt all new onshore fossil fuel leasing.

WECAN at the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress

August 31, 2016

Patricia Gualinga (right) presents the Living Forests proposal and speaks out against oil drilling in the Ecuadorian Amazon. Photo by Emily Arasim. 

This September, the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network will speak for climate justice, women's leadership, Indigenous and  frontline women’s struggles and solutions, and deep systemic change at the 2016 International Union for the Conservation of Nature's (IUCN) 'World Conservation Congress'.

IUCN is the world’s largest environmental organization, comprised of both governmental and civil society representatives. The IUCN World Conservation Congress, held once every four years and this year's 'Planet at the Crossroads' conference will focus specifically on action to fulfill the Paris Climate Agreement, adopted by 195 world governments in 2015.

As a global network of women for climate justice, the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN) International is committed to bringing the voices of grassroots, frontline and Indigenous women community and Earth defenders into such spaces to share their struggles, experiences and solutions and to demonstrate resistance to false solutions to the climate crisis, while offering clear directives for a just and safe energy transition.  WECAN International is glad to have the opportunity to participate in the World Conservation Congress this year as a voice for climate justice, the Earth and all generations - calling for and presenting effective, just, women-led solutions to address the interwoven social and ecologic crisis that we face.

WECAN International and Gender Program allies at IUCN will co-sponsor and present the key panel 'A Deep Dive on Gender and Environment: Exploring the Policy Landscape, Strategies in Action, and Women’s Frontlines Solutions’. 

Additionally, WECAN is honored to be collaborating with Amazon Watch, the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and diverse allies gathering at IUCN through the Sacred Lands Film network. 

Detailed Information:

Patricia Gualinga, longtime WECAN ally and Director of International Relations for the People of Sarayaku, Ecuadorian Amazon, has been invited by WECAN International ( co-sponsored by WECAN and  Amazon Watch) to present during the session 'A Deep Dive on Gender and Environment: Exploring the Policy Landscape, Strategies in Action, and Women’s Frontlines Solutions’.  Close ally, Leila Salazar Lopez, Executive Director of Amazon Watch, will be interpreting for Patricia, and Osprey Orielle Lake , Executive Director of WECAN International will be presenting at this session about women and climate justice  .

We will focus on women-led solutions to protect natural and sacred places vulnerable to climate change and threats of resource extraction, including the rainforests of the Amazon.

The “Living Forest” proposal of the Sarayaku people's of the Ecuadorian Amazon, presented for many years and  globally during the United Nations COP21 climate negotiations in Paris last year, will serve as a key foundation for our strategy and call to action. 

Standing with the people of Sarayaku and many allies, we will advocate for ‘No Go policies’ for mineral and oil extraction in relation to World Heritage Sites, sacred natural sites and primary forests. 

It's imperative that Indigenous voices and solutions that respect "living forests" are heard at this event and throughout the IUCN World  Conservation Congress.

With Sarayaku's ancestral territory under imminent threat from state-sanctioned oil drilling, their vision is not only compelling - it offers the best hope for protecting their territory, culture and communities, and the health, and wellbeing of our global climate.

Additionally, we will present the Women’s Climate Action Agenda, a comprehensive WECAN report analyzing the root causes of the climate crisis, and sharing the solutions and demands of global frontline women on issues ranging from forests, oceans, agriculture, fossil resistance and much more.

A Deep Dive on Gender and Environment: Exploring the Policy Landscape, Strategies in Action, and Women’s Frontlines Solutions
 

Monday, September 5th, 2016

8:30 to 10:30am, Workshop in Room 317B

Click here for details on the IUCN webpage

About the event: IUCN and partners will bring together leaders from across the Union to illustrate real-case best practices, lessons and innovations for gender-responsive environmental action. Participants will be engaged in cutting-edge discussion, aiming to uncover the hurdles and bottlenecks to conservation, and committing to key actions. In partnership with WECAN—the Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network—the importance of grassroots women’s perspectives and innovations will be a special focus, examining where gaps remain and where women’s voices are urgently needed for propelling progress.

Speakers Include:

  • Patricia Gualinga, Kichwa Leader, Sarayaku Ecuadorian Amazon
  • Bridget Burns, Women’s Environment and Development Organization (WEDO) Co-Director
  • Sally Ranney, IUCN Patron of Nature and WECAN Co-founder
  • Lorena Aguilar, IUCN Global Senior Gender Adviser
  • Osprey-Orielle Lake, Women's Earth and Climate Action Network Co-founder/Executive Director
  • Arzu Rana Deuba, IUCN Councilor from Nepal, Chair of the Gender Task Force
  • Luther Bois Anukur, IUCN Regional Director, Eastern/Southern Africa
  • Cotilda Nakyeyune, IUCN Uganda Country Office Head of Office
  • Miguel Avila Moraes, IUCN Brazil National Coordinator
  • Matti Nummelin, Government of Finland
  • Julia Duncan Cassell Liberia
  • Fadi Al-Shraideh, IUCN Regional Director, West Asia

PRESS RELEASE - Historic Gathering of Indigenous Leaders Champion “No Go” Areas For Sacred Sites at IUCN World Conservation Congress

August 24, 2016

Altai Project | Amazon Watch | Borneo Project | Gaia Foundation

Protect Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana | Sacred Land Film Project

Womens’ Earth and Climate Action Network

 

MEDIA ADVISORY CONTACT: Andrew Miller, 202-423-4828

August 24, 2016 andrew@amazonwatch.org

Other Contacts Below

 

Historic Gathering of Indigenous Leaders Champion “No Go” Areas

For Sacred Sites at IUCN World Conservation Congress


WHAT: A delegation of 25 powerful indigenous leaders from around the world will attend the quadrennial IUCN World Conservation Congress (WCC) in Honolulu, Hawai‘i, from September 1–10. The WCC is the world’s largest recurring conservation event attended by government, corporate, nonprofit and academic leaders, among its many influencers. The indigenous delegation will amplify the connection between indigenous peoples and biodiversity in sacred cultural landscapes, including the world’s lands, seas and skies, which are vulnerable to climate change and other threats. They will both challenge and contribute to the international conservation movement at a critical moment in history, in part by promoting the concept of “No Go” policies that prohibit mineral and other resource extraction in World Heritage Sites, sacred natural sites, territories and primary forests as well as other indigenous solutions to climate change. The delegation will be working to pass Motion 026 on “Protected areas and environmentally damaging industrial-scale activities” viewable at portals.iucn.org/congress/motion/026.


KEY EVENTS

 

Dialogue with the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: Conservation Activities and the Fulfilment of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

WHEN: Saturday, September 3, 1:00–2:30pm, 314, UNDP Kauhale

WHO: The Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Victoria Tauli-Corpuz; Aura Tegria, U’WA; Gonzalo Oviedo, IUCN.

URL: portals.iucn.org/congress/session/12620


Workshop: From Rhetoric to Reality: Exploring laws, customary governance and No-Go area policies for future protection of sacred natural sites.

WHEN: Sunday, September 4, 11am–1pm, Room 315, Hawai‘i Convention Center

WHO: Indigenous leaders from Hawai‘i, Kenya, Ecuador, Ethiopia and Altai, Russia

URL: portals.iucn.org/congress/session/10217


Cultural Event with Film Screening: “40 Years of Aloha Aina”

WHEN: Sunday September 4, 7:30–9pm, Room 312, Hawai‘i Convention Center

WHO: Craig Neff, Luana Busby-Neff and the Protect Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana

URL: portals.iucn.org/congress/session/15490


Workshop: A Deep Dive on Gender and Climate Change: Exploring Policy Progress, Implementation Challenges, and Women’s Frontlines Solutions

WHEN: Monday, September 5, 8:30–10:30am, Room 317B, Hawai‘i Convention Center

WHO: Patricia Gualinga (Ecuador), Osprey-Orielle Lake (WECAN International)

URL: portals.iucn.org/congress/session/10233

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INDIGENOUS LEADERS AVAILABLE FOR INTERVIEWS


Altai Republic, Russia

Danil Mamyev, Founder of Uch Enmek Nature Park, Altai, Russia

Vyacheslav “Slava” Cheltuev, snow leopard shaman

 

Benin

Oussoi Lio Appolinaire, son of local chief, Director of GRABE


Colombia

Aura Tegría Cristancho, indigenous lawyer from the U’wa Nation


Ecuador

Nina Gualinga, Youth Indigenous Leader from Sarayaku, Ecuador

Patricia Gualinga, International Relations Director Sarayaku

 

Hawai‘i

Emmett Aluli, Physician, Kaho‘olawe activist

Davianna McGregor, History professor, Univ. of Hawai‘i

Craig Neff, artist, activist, owner of The Hawaiian Force

Luana Busby-Neff, cultural practitioner


Kenya

Molu Kulu Galgallo, Gabbra ritual elder

Simon Mitambo, Njuri Ncheke Council of Elders, African Biodiversity Network coordinator


Kyrgyzstan

Kamil Mamadaliev, Manaschi (reciter of Manas epics)

 

Malaysia: Borneo

Komeok Joe, Penan Leader

Peter Kallang, Kenyah Leader, Chairman of Save Sarawak Rivers


Mongolia

Altantsetseg Tsedendamba, Association for Protection of Altai Cultural Heritage

Oyunbaatar Tseren, shaman, Tengriin Sylder Shamans Association


Papua New Guinea

Melchior Ware, biologist, Bosmun village elder

Banak Gamui, biologist, Executive Director of the Karawari Caves Arts Project  


United States

Caleen Sisk, Winnemem Wintu Chief

Dorothy FireCloud, Rosebud Sioux, National Park Service superintendent

 

Click here for more detailed information on events and detailed biographies of indigenous leaders.

 

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CONTACTS


Amazon Watch, Andrew Miller, andrew@amazonwatch.org, 202-423-4828

Sacred Land Film Project, Christopher (Toby) McLeod, tm@sacredland.org, 650-400-9000

Gaia Foundation, Fiona Wilton, fiona@gaianet.org, +57-316-4901699

Borneo Project, Jettie Word, jettie@borneoproject.org, 505-250-3843

Altai Project, Jennifer Castner, 510-393-5525

Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International), Emily Arasim,  emily@wecaninternational.org, 505-920-0153

WECAN At The 2016 World Social Forum, Montreal

August 08, 2016

The Women's Earth and Climate Action Network will be on the ground during the World Social Forum in Montreal, Canada, August 9-14, 2016.

The World Social Forum is the worlds largest, critical center of civil society and grassroots global movement building for those engaged in issues of social justice and human rights, decolonization, racial justice, and climate struggles and solutions, among others.

WECAN International is thrilled to be collaborating with diverse colleagues at the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature to present a roundtable and conference 'A World In Which Nature Has Rights' (Aug 11) and 'Rights of Nature Forum' (Aug 11) - and to be partnering with Grassroots Global Justice Alliance and Global Forest Coalition for a roundtable on 'Women for Climate Justice' (Aug 12).

Learn more about the World Social Forum here.

Learn more about events led by WECAN International and colleagues below.

 

A World in Which Nature Has Rights (Roundtable)

Aug 11, 2016  

9:00 - 11:30

Université du Québec à Montréal – Pavillon A (Local DS-2505)

320, rue Sainte-Catherine Est
Montréal, QC, Canada

Is fracking a violation of the rights of nature? What about polluting the atmosphere, mountaintop removal, or mega-dams? In recent years the power of the global movement for Rights of Nature – recognizing legal standing for ecosystems – has been growing quickly, partly due to the popularity of local and international Rights of Nature tribunals. These dynamic tribunals allow a glimpse into the world of the near future, where ecosystems are no longer seen as property to be destroyed, but living systems with rights in a court of law. International Rights of Nature Tribunals in Ecuador, Peru and in France were held with the aim of exposing violations of the Earth and our communities, while simultaneously creating a new legal framework that respects and defends the inherent rights of Mother Earth. Join leading advocates of the Rights of Nature movement to explore this campaign to stop the commodification of nature and for a new earth jurisprudence.

 

Rights of Nature Forum (Conference)

Aug 11, 2016

13:00 - 15:30

Université du Québec à Montréal – Pavillon A (Local DE-1580)

1440, rue Sanguinet
Montréal, QC, Canada

The Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature is a worldwide network of individuals and organizations committed to transforming our human relationship with our planet.

Recognizing Rights of Nature is a ground breaking new legal structure that fundamentally changes the legal standing of ecosystems. Rather than treating nature as property under the law, rights of nature acknowledges that nature in all its life forms has the right to exist, persist, maintain and regenerate its vital cycles.

The Global Alliance for the Rights Nature is committed to disseminate the ground-breaking, paradigm-changer idea of recognizing Nature as a subject of rights, and it is convinced of the importance of promoting Rights of Nature Tribunals that are a very efficient tool to communicate how the world will be a very different place if Rights of Nature where recognized and guaranteed. This forum will also serve to share the worldwide experiences of Rights of Nature recognition in countries like Ecuador, Bolivia, USA, New Zealand and others.

 

Women for Climate Justice (Roundtable)

Aug 12, 2016

13:00 - 15:30

 Université du Québec à Montréal – Pavillon DS (Local DS-2505)

320, rue Sainte-Catherine Est
Montréal, QC, Canada

This event will feature women leaders sharing analysis and experience in their struggles and solutions for climate justice. Presenters will discuss root causes of the climate crisis and present a diverse array of visions and strategies to shape a healthy and equitable world. This event is presented with the conviction that real forward movement towards climate justice depends on the full and equal participation of women at all stages of decision making and implementation, and that bold and transformative change will come from women mobilizing and taking action at all levels. Included in the discussion will be the intersectionality of gender and environment and colonialism and racism, as they are connected to patriarchy institutionalized across the globe. Presented by the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, Grassroots Global Justice Alliance (GGJA), and Global Forest Coalition.

PRESS RELEASE - Indigenous Women of North and South to Speak for Climate Justice and Solutions During UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

April 28, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Media Contact:

Emily Arasim

Communications Coordinator

Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org

 

Indigenous Women of North and South to Speak for

Climate Justice and Solutions During UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

 

BAY AREA, Calif., April 28, 2016 – Indigenous women of the world stand on the frontline of intensifying climate change impacts, and are vital solution bearers and leaders of efforts to restore justice and health to our communities and the Earth.

 

On the occasion of the 2016 United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Indigenous women leaders of North and South America will convene to make their stories, demands and solutions heard by the public, media and government representativesat a vital parallel event, ‘Indigenous Women of the Americas Protecting Mother Earth: Struggles and Climate Change Solutions’, to be co-hosted by the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, Amazon Watch andthe Indigenous Environmental Network on May 12, 2016 from 1:00 to 3:00 at the Church Center for the United Nations, New York City.

 

Speakers including Camp Horinek (Ponca Nation Leader, Oklahoma, USA), Kandi Mossett (By Skype-Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara Native Energy & Climate Campaign Organizer with the Indigenous Environmental Network, North Dakota, USA), Gloria Ushigua (to be confirmed - President of the Association of Sapara Women, Amazon of Ecuador), Crystal Lameman (Beaver Lake Cree Nation Treaty Coordinator and Communications Manager, Alberta, Canada) and Aura Tegria Cristancho (Asou'Wa Legal Advisor, U'wa leader, Colombia) will speak out against the environmentally and socially destructive activities and policies threatening their homelands, and present the visions and strategies with which they are working to shape an equitable, thriving future for generations to come.

 

Their diverse struggles and solutions will be contextualized within a frame of rapid climate change, health issues, biologic and cultural diversity loss, and destructive economic frameworks, demonstrating exactly why honoring Indigenous rights and knowledge is so essential for the survival and prosperity of us all. Additional comments will be shared by Leo Cerda (Amazon Watch) andOsprey Orielle Lake (WECAN).

 

“From the Alberta tar sands in Canada and the Amazon of Ecuador, to the fracking fields of the North Dakota and Oklahoma plains, Indigenous women are standing up to protect our water, air, forests and soil from the damages of the fossil fuel industry and continuing threats of colonization, economic inequality and social injustice,” explained Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, “They refuse to allow for the perpetuation of violence against women and the Earth. They are making connections, building community power, and showing us that another path is possible. We must stand with the defenders of the land, listen to and amplify the voices of strong Indigenous women leaders, and implement their vital strategies and solutions immediately. Through forums such as this, wecan change the narrative and build the world we seek.”

 

‘Indigenous Women of the Americas Protecting Mother Earth: Struggles and Climate Change Solutions’ is free and open to the public, and will be held Thursday May 12, 2016 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm at the Church Center of the United Nations, 10th floor 777 United Nations Plaza #8g, New York, NY 10017. Registration required.

 

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About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN International)

www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL

 

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted effort established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. Recent work includes the 2013 International Women’s Earth and Climate Summit, Women’s Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women’s Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women’s for Forests and Fossil Fuel/Mining/Mega Dam Resistance, US Women’s Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) organization.

Women for Climate Justice Respond to Signing of the Paris Climate Accord Earth Day - April 22, 2016

April 22, 2016

Members of the WECAN delegation and allies present during the COP21 climate negotiations in Paris, France. Pictured left to right: Casey Camp Horinek (Ponca Nation leader, Indigenous Environmental Network representative, WECAN Special Projects Advisor) and Neema Namadamu (WECAN DR Congo Coordinator)

On December 12, 2015, representatives from 195 countries finalized the Paris Climate Accord, a historic document hailed as the most ambitious ever international plan for action on climate change. Today, Earth Day, April 22, 2016, more than 160 nations are gathered at the United Nations in New York City to officially sign the agreement and initiate domestic ratification processes.

The US and China, collectively responsible for over 40 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, have released statements vowing to sign the Paris Accord. The Accord will take effect when 55 nations representing at least 55% of global emissions have completed both the official signing and national ratification process.

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network recognizes the immense effort in the drafting and adoption of this historic document, and is invigorated by the critical global unity displayed in its creation. We celebrate world governments reaching for an aspirational target of no more than 1.5 degree Celsius temperature rise, noting that it was the pressure of civil society that ensured this critical target, and that it will be the power of people that will keep governments feet to the fire as we move forward towards this goal.

We recognize however, that for all ofits historic strides, the Paris Accord is wholly insufficient given the urgency and the scale of the environmental and social devastation with which we are faced.

It is an agreement that rests on non-binding commitments, that skirts around historic responsibility, and which relies upon carbon markets and techno-fixes which will ultimately only push the Earth further towards climate crisis through dependence on destructive extractive economies. It is an agreement void of any direct mention of fossil fuels, despite clear scientific data that 84% of remaining fossil fuel reserves must stay in the ground to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement.

In choosing to continue down the path of economic disparity and commodification of nature, our world governments fail to see the stark reality of the climate crisis – a crisis that can only be addressed through confronting and transforming the systemic injustices ofour political, social and economic systems from the ground, up.

The change that we seeks requires fundamental respect for human rights, Indigenous rights, women’s rights, rights of Mother Earth, and the rights of all generations to come – and these aspects are all missing from the binding section of the Paris Agreement.

The math of the Accord simply does not add up – we remain on a path towards a 3.2 to 3.7 degree global temperature rise. From where women standon the frontlines, in the streets, in the homes, in the forests, on the farms, on the edges of the rising seas - we know that this is not a future that we can or will accept.

Today and everyday, we the people must speak up and take action without fail, pushing to ensure that our governments raise the bar and enact much more ambitious national policies, just action plans and strong Paris Agreement commitments.

Simultaneously, we must organize, reclaim our community power, and continue actively building the world that we envision, in resistance to the economic, social, and political institutions that refuse to break with the status quo.

We must continue to bring the voices of women to the forefront, acknowledging that they are at once both the most severely impacted by climate change, and also the key to just climate solutions, community strength and a living, thriving future.

Our work, the work that will define our time and the lives of generations to come, has just begun – and we have only a short window of time for meaningful action. We as a peoples movement must rise up like the immune system of the Earth herself, demanding just, decentralized and democratic systems, fighting false climate solutions, and actively building the world that we seek.

Press requests: emily@wecaninternational.org

 

On the streets in Paris, France during COP21 highlighting the power of the growing people’s movement for climate justice

PRESS RELEASE - Over Five-Hundred Indigenous Women of the Amazon and Allies March for Climate Justice, Indigenous Rights on International Women’s Day

March 10, 2016
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Contact:
Emily Arasim, Communications Coordinator
Women's Earth and Climate Action Network

Kevin Koenig 
Amazon Watch 

Belen Paez 
Pachamama Alliance 
 
Over Five-Hundred Indigenous Women of the Amazon and Allies
March for Climate Justice, Indigenous Rights on International Women's Day
 

PUYO, Ecuador, March 9, 2016 - In recognition of International Women's Day, Indigenous Amazonian women leaders of seven nationalities including: Andoa, Achuar, Kichwa, Shuar, Shiwiar, Sapara and Waorani nationalities and their international allies took action in Puyo, Ecuador, in a forum and march in defense of the Amazon, Mother Earth and for climate justice. Specifically, they came together to denounce a newly signed oil contract between the Ecuadorian government and Chinese oil corporation Andes Petroleum. 

 
By plane, foot, canoe, and bus, some five hundred women mobilized from deep in their rainforest territories and nearby provinces marching through the streets of the Amazon jungle town of Puyo.
 
Chanting, "Defend the forest, don't sell it!" and carrying signs reading "No more persecution against women defenders of Mother Earth," the march culminated in a rally in which each nationality denounced the new oil threat and shared traditional songs and ceremonies. The women spoke of other methods for protecting and defending the Amazon and its vital living systems, making it known that the women of the Amazon are not just victims of environmental and cultural genocide, but rather are vital solution bearers.
 
In addition to highlighting the grave social and ecologic implications of this new contract and the Ecuadorian government's plans to tender several more oil blocks in the pristine, roadless southern Amazon, the women and allies brought light to their struggles and the ongoing criminalization faced as they stand to protect and defend their territories and lifeways based upon living in harmony with the natural world. A tribute was held in honor of Berta Caceres, the Honduran indigenous environmental leader who was killed last week for her years of work defending rights and territories from privatization, plantations, and most recently, a mega dam project.
 
The women of the Amazon were also joined by Casey Camp Horinek, WECAN delegation member and Indigenous leader of the Ponca Nation of Oklahoma, who shared her traditional songs and stories of how her people have been impacted by fracking activity.
 
 
 
"Right now the oil company is trying to enter our territory. That is our homeland, this is where we have our chakras (gardens), where we feed our families. We are warriors, and we are not afraid. We will never negotiate," explained Rosalia Ruiz, a Sapara leader from the community of Torimbo, which is inside the Block 83 oil concession.
 
"Although we are from three different provinces, we are one territory and one voice," Alicia Cahuiya, Waorani leader declared.
 
As the march unfolded, the Ecuadorian government and Andes Petroleum held a meeting in the nearby town of Shell to organize an illegal entry into Sapara territory, knowing that key leaders would not be present. Outraged, a delegation of Sapara delivered a letter to the meeting, underscoring their peoples' opposition to the oil project and governments tactics to divide the community. They successfully thwarted the government and company plans, and returned to the streets, victorious.
 
International allies including the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, Amazon Watch and Pachamama Alliance shared messages of solidarity and calls for immediate action to keep fossil fuels in the ground in the Amazon.
 
"On this International Women's Day we are reaching across borders and standing together as global women for climate justice to denounce oil extraction in the Amazon and call for attention to the struggles and solutions of local women land defenders," explained Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women's Earth and Climate Action Network, "We all depend on the flourishing of these precious rainforests, the lungs of the planet. Now is the time to keep the oil in the ground and stand with the women who have been putting their bodies on the line for years to protect the forest, their cultures, and the health and well being of all future generations."
 
"Today was a historic day for indigenous Amazonian women! It was the first time that hundreds of women and their allies marched for the Amazon, Mother Earth and Climate Justice. And the power of women was so strong that plans for oil companies entering Sápara territory today were halted. This is is a signal that the collective call to defend rights and territories by keeping fossil fuels in the ground is working," says Leila Salazar-López, Executive Director of Amazon Watch.
 
 
Belen Paez from Pachamama Alliance declared: "It's a unique and historical moment to have the experience of solidarity and connection between indigenous women and activists from all over the world standing up for the rights of the Amazon rainforest and its people, we have all been waiting for this moment for so long, and that moment is now."
 
The March 8 forum, action and press conference will be followed by a March 9 event and report back, 'Women of Ecuadorian Amazon and International Allies Stand For Protection of the Amazon Rainforest' to be held on March 9 at 17:00 at the Biblioteca FLASCO, Universidad FLACSO, Quito.
 
A solidarity action was also held at the Chinese consulate in San Francisco, CA, to denounce the new oil contracts on Sapara and Kichwa territory and support women's rights in Ecuador and around the world. 
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Photos by Mike Riech/Pachamama Alliance 
 
About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN International)
@WECAN_INTL
 
The Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted effort established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. Recent work includes the International Women's Earth and Climate Summit, Women's Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women's Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women's for Forests and Fossil Fuel/Mining/Mega Dam Resistance, US Women's Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women's Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC) organization and its partner eraGlobal Alliance.

PRESS RELEASE: Indigenous Women of the Ecuadorian Amazon and Global Allies to Reject New Oil Contracts on International Women’s Day

March 05, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:

Emily Arasim

Communications Coordinator

Women’s Earth & Climate Action Network

+1 (505) 920-0153

emily@wecaninternational.org

Indigenous Women of the Ecuadorian Amazon and Global Allies to Reject New Oil Contracts on International Women’s Day

QUITO, Ecuador March 4, 2016 – On International Women’s Day, March 8, 2016, a collective of Indigenous women leaders of the Ecuadorian Amazon and their global allies will march together and participate in forums and press conferences in Puyo, Ecuador to reject newly signed oil contracts in the territories of the Sarayaku and Sapara people.

The women are gathering to stand for the rights of Indigenous communities and women land defenders and in the protection and defense of the Amazon rainforest.

The new oil contract, signed between the Ecuadorian government and Chinese oil corporation Andes Petroleum, opens up almost a million acres of pristine Amazonian Rainforest and threatens irreversible devastation of the forest’s magnificent ecological, social and cultural diversity, including the dislocation of the Sapara people, whose language and culture has been officially recognized by UNESCO as an "Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity".

In light of the central role of the Amazon Rainforest in absorbing climate change inducing greenhouse gases, and in creating and maintaining the cyclesof air and water upon which all life depends, this latest oil contract must be seen not only as an absolutely unacceptableviolation of local ecosystems and community rights, but as a betrayal of immense global significance.

“We reject this oil policy of the government and the possibility of further oil concessions in the southern Amazon,” a coalition of Amazonian womenleadersdeclared in a recent statement, “We denounce that deceptive mechanisms have been used to obtain signatures of community members in order to justify supposed prior consultation processes. We stand firm in the defense of our territories, for the defense of life and the good living of our families and communities.”

Women leaders of the Sapara and Shiwiar Nationalities, and the Kichwa Kawsak Sacha and Sarayaku Peoples, including Patricia Gualinga and Ena Santi (Kichwa of Sarayaku) and Gloria Ushigua (Sapara) will unite in Puyo on March 8 for a day of events and actions denouncing the contractandexposingits implications for Indigenous rights, Earth rights, global climate change and the lives and livelihoods of local women and communities.

They will be accompanied in solidarity by delegations of international partners including the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, Amazon Watch and Terra Mater, working to bring international attention to the grave intertwined threats of social and ecologic devastation facing the Amazon and it’s Indigenous communities as a result of oil concessions, while highlighting the powerful visions and solutions of local women leaders.

Following the series of March 8 International Women’s Day actions in Puyo, select international delegation members and local leaders will return to Quito, the capital of Ecuador, to present an afternoon event and report back session, ‘Women of Ecuadorian Amazon and International Allies Stand For Protection of the Amazon Rainforest’ to be held on March 9 at 17:00 at the Biblioteca FLASCO, Universidad FLACSO, Quito.

“On this International Women’sDay we are reaching across borders and standing together as global women for climate justice to denounce oil extraction in the Amazon and call for attention to the struggles and solutions of local women land defenders,”explained Osprey Orielle Lake, Executive Director of the Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network,“We all depend on the flourishing of these precious rainforests, the lungs of the planet. Now is the time to keep the oil in the ground and stand with the women who have been putting their bodies on the line for years to protect the forest, their cultures, and the health and well being of all future generations.”

Concerned allies around the world are signing a critical petition and statements directly from the Indigenous women of the Ecuadorian Amazon, making it known that the eyes of the international community are on Ecuador and Andes Petroleum to cancel this latest contract and move immediately to keep oil in the ground in the Amazon.

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About The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network (WECAN International) www.wecaninternational.org

@WECAN_INTL

The Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is a solutions-based, multi-faceted effort established to engage women worldwide as powerful stakeholders in climate change, climate justice, and sustainability solutions. Recent work includes the International Women’s Earth and Climate Summit, Women’s Climate Declaration, and WECAN Women’s Climate Action Agenda. International climate advocacy is complemented with on-the-ground programs such as the Women’s for Forests and Fossil Fuel/Mining/Mega Dam Resistance, US Women’s Climate Justice Initiative, and Regional Climate Solutions Trainings in the Middle East North Africa region, Latin America, and Democratic Republic of Congo. WECAN International was founded in 2013 as a project of the 501(c)3 Women’s Earth and Climate Caucus (WECC).

URGENT ACTION: Women of the Ecuadorian Amazon and International Allies Reject New Oil Concessions, Stand For Rights of the Earth and Communities

February 09, 2016

Women of the Ecuadorian Amazon and International Allies Reject New Oil Concessions, Stand For Rights of the Earth and Communities

Click here to add your personal signature to the petition

Please email emily@wecaninternational.org with organizational or Executive Director sign-ons

In late January, 2016, the government of Ecuador signed a contract with Chinese corporation Andes Petroleum, handing over rights for oil exploration and extraction in two controversial Amazonian blocks which overlap the traditional territory of the Sápara and Kichwa peoples of the Ecuadorian Amazon. The Sápara Indigenous people are a small, threatened group of only 300, officially recognized by UNESCO as an "Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity".

Concession plans open up almost a million acres in the center of Ecuador’s road-less southeastern Amazon, where Indigenous communities have successfully prevented fossil fuel extraction for decades. The concession means large swaths of deforestation and irreversible devastation of the forest’s magnificent ecological, social and cultural diversity.

The implications of this contract for the rights and health of local communities and ecosystems, as well as for climate disruption at a global scale, cannot be overstated. Approximately 20 percent of the carbon dioxide produced from burning fossil fuels is absorbed by tropical forests around the world, and this is just one of many critical ecologic functions. Consequently, protecting the Amazon rainforest, the largest of the world’s tropical forests, must be central to local and international environmental and economic policies.

Within this context, Indigenous peoples and their rights must be respected and protected because it is their intimate relationship with their forests and their courageous ongoing struggles to defend their territories that has and will continue to bring about the highest protection of the Amazon.

The government of Ecuador has signed this most recent oil contract just months after pledging at the UN COP21 climate negotiations in Paris to take action alongside 195 countries to keep global warming below 2.0 degree Celsius. Scientists have stated that we must keep 80% of global fossil fuel reserves in the ground to avoid climate catastrophe. Oil extraction in the Amazon will contribute to the negation of the Paris Agreement and the demands of science.

The Ecuadorian government claims to have consulted the Sápara in accordance with Article 57 of their constitution, which requires Free, Prior, and Informed Consultation (FPIC). However, rather than consult the communities, as Ecuador's constitution requires, and obtain their consent, which is required under international law, the government has wager a campaign to divide the Sápara. Despite the government's false claims of community approval and attempts to create its own Sápara federation, the only legitimate representative body of the Sápara people does not recognize any agreement for access to their territory.

The Sápara people and the Kichwa of Sarayaku have denounced the new contracts as a violation of their fundamental rights, and have made clear their intentions to keep resisting extraction and protecting their rainforest.

In solidarity, we call for cancelation of the new oil contract for Block 79 and 83 in the Ecuadorian Amazon; demand action by the government of Ecuador to heed the calls of the Sápara and Kichwa to immediately halt all further exploration and extraction in the Amazon; and call for international action to expose the rights violations occurring in Ecuador. Further, we call for alternative options to be explored by the Ecuadorian government and international community to address oil extraction in the Amazon caused by economic pressures.

Finally, we express urgent concern about the violence against Indigenous women working to protect their territories, families and cultures. We are watching, and we will not stand for abuse against our sisters and brothers.

In response to the request of Indigenous allies, the full ‘Statement of Amazonian Indigenous Women In Defense of Life, Territory and Good Living’ and ‘Statement of the Association of Sapara Women’ are presented below in Spanish and English. We stand in solidarity with these pronouncements.

Osprey-Orielle Lake (Executive Director, Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network, International)

Leila Salazar Lopez (Executive Director, Amazon Watch)

STATEMENT OF AMAZONIAN INDIGENOUS WOMEN IN DEFENSE OF LIFE, TERRITORY, AND ‘GOOD LIVING’ (BUEN VIVIR) Puyo, Ecuador, Feburary 02, 2016

In the city of Puyo, we, Amazonian indigenous women, representatives of the Sapara and Shiwiar Nationalities, the Kichwa Kawsak Sacha and Sarayaku Peoples, and the communities of the Bobonaza Basin, want to express our deep concern with the contract of exploitation and exploration signed by the Ministry of Hydrocarbons with the company Andes Petroleum for Blocks 79 and 83 that directly affect the Sapara, Kichwa, Shiwiar, and Sarayaku territories.

We reject the signing of this contract which will affect our territories, the forest, the water, and the air; exactly how we have seen it occur in Block 10 in the Province of Pastaza. This is where serious social and environmental impacts have been generated, where women are the main victims and their ability to feed their families becomes impaired. There is deterioration of family health, and they suffer the division of their communities and other forms of violence.

This government policy has infringed on our rights since we have not been adequately consulted. We as women have not been considered and we have not participated in those government informational meetings. Plus, the consultations were not carried out as mandated by the ruling of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (IACHR) in the 2012 case Sarayaku v. Ecuador.

Blocks 79 and 83 affect more than 40% of the Sapara Nationality’s territory which was recognized by UNESCO as a "Masterpiece of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity" on May 18, 2001 because their language and culture are in danger of disappearing. This threat is increased with the development of an oil project in these territories.

Therefore, we reject this oil policy of the government and the possibility of further oil concessions in the southern Amazon; We denounce that deceptive mechanisms have been used to obtain signatures of community members in order to justify supposed prior consultation processes. We stand firm in the defense of our territories, for the defense of life and the good living of our families and communities.

Attentively,

Nancy Santi - President of the Association of Kawsak Sacha Women

Gloria Ushigua - President of the Association of Sapara Women

Zoila Castillo - Territory Leader Bobonaza Basin

Hilda Santi - Leader,  Kichwa People of Sarayaku

Patricia Gualinga - Leader of International Relations, Kichwa People of Sarayaku    

PRONUNCIAMIENTO DE LAS MUJERES INDÍGENAS AMAZÓNICAS POR LA DEFENSA DE LA VIDA EL TERRITORIO Y EL BUEN VIVIR

Puyo, 02 de febrero de 2016

En la cuidad de Puyo, las mujeres indígenas amazónicas, representantes de las Nacionalidades Sapara, Shiwiar y los Pueblos Kichwa Kawsak Sacha, Sarayaku y las comunidades del Cuenca del Bobonaza queremos expresar nuestro profunda preocupación al contrato de explotación y exploración firmado por parte del Ministerio de Hidrocarburos con la empresa Andes Petrolum de los Bloques 79 y 83 que afectan directamente los territorios de las Nacionalidad Sapara, Kichwa, Shiwiar y el Pueblo Kichwa de Sasrayaku.

Rechazamos la firma de este contrato que afectará nuestros territorios, el bosque, el agua, aire, tal como lo he visto en el bloque 10 en la provincia del Pastaza, donde se han  generado  graves impactos socio ambientales, donde las mujeres son las principales víctimas que ven afectadas sus posibilidades de alimentar a la familia, el deterioro de la salud familiar, y sufren la división de sus comunidades y otras formas de violencia.

Está política del gobierno ha vulnerado nuestros derechos ya que no hemos sido adecuadamente consultadas, las mujeres no hemos sido consideradas y no hemos participado en esos eventos de socialización, además estás consultas no fueron realizadas según lo manda la sentencia de la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (CorteIDH) en el caso Sarayaku v. Ecuador de 2012.

Los bloques 79 y 83 afectan más del 40% del territorio de la Nacionalidad Sapara que tiene el reconocimiento de la UNESCO, como “Obra Maestra del Patrimonio Cultural e Inmaterial de la Humanidad”; otorgado el 18 de mayo de 2001, por cuanto su lengua y su cultura se encuentran en peligro de desaparecer, amenaza que se incrementa con el desarrollo de un proyecto petrolero en estos territorios.

Por lo tano rechazamos esta política petrolera del gobierno y la posibilidad de más concesiones petroleras en el sur de la Amazonía, denunciamos que se ha utilizado mecanismos engañosos para conseguir firmas de los/as miembros de las comunidades para justificas supuestos procesos de consulta previa, nos mantendremos firmes en la defensa de nuestros territorios, por la defensa de la vida y el buen vivir de nuestras familias y comunidades.

Atentamente, 

Nancy Santi - Presidenta de la Asociacion de Mujeres Kawsak Sacha

Gloria Ushigua - Presidenta de la Asociacion de Mujeres Sapara

Zoila Castillo -  Dirigenta Territorio Cuenca del Bobonaza                 

Hilda Santi - Lidereza del Pueblo Kichwa de Sarayaku

Patricia Gualinga - Dirigenta de Relaciones Internacionales del Pueblo Sarayaku

THE ASSOCIATION OF WOMEN OF THE SAPARA INDIGENOUS NATION OF THE ECUADORIAN AMAZON…

Denounces the government of Ecuador who signed two contracts through the Ministry of Hydrocarbons, represented by the secretary of Hydrocarbons, Ivnna Fabara, and the president of Andes Petroleum Ecuador, Zhao Xinjun.

The agreement was realized with the provision of services by the companies China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) and China Petrochemical Corporation (Sinopec), which form part of the consortium Andes Petroleum - with a duration of four years for exploration and twenty years for the exploitation of crude oil in deposits in the south of the Amazon in the so called ‘Block 74’, ‘Block 79’ and ‘Block 83’, situated in the Amazonian province of Pastaza in the east of Ecuador, in our ancestral territory.

We demand:

  1. Respect for our rights as an Indigenous Nation
  2. Conservation of our Territory, our forests and the Ecuadorian Amazon
  3. Respect and conservation of all protected areas and the Yasuni National Park
  4. The nullification of the contract with Andes Petroleum Ecuador
  5. The immediate end of exploration in Block 74, 79 and 83
  6. No actualization of the exploitation of the oil deposits in Block 74, 79 and 83

Our territory is threatened by Chinese oil transnationals. Our nation and families are seeing our rights violated, and the loss and contamination of our territory. We are aware that investments of this magnitude bring other consequences, like an increase in emissions of greenhouse gases, illegal deforestation, loss of biodiversity, among other things.

We are ready to protect, defend and die for our forest, families, territory and nation. We ask of organizations, Indigenous Nations, civil society and all of the national and international populations –join us – support us in signing this declaration.

LAS MUJERES ASO DE LA NACION INDIGENA SAPARA DE LA AMAZONIA ECUATORIANA…

Denunciamos al gobierno de Ecuador que suscribió la firma de dos contratos mediante el ministerio de hidrocarburos, representada por la secretaria de Hidrocarburos, Ivonne Fabara, y el presidente de Andes Petroleum Ecuador, Zhao Xinjun.

La firma se la realiza como convenio bajo la modalidad de prestación de servicios con las empresas China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) y China Petrochemical Corporation (Sinopec), que forman parte del consorcio Andes Petroleum, con una duración de cuatro años para la exploración y veinte años para la explotación de crudo en yacimientos en el sur de la Amazonía, en los denominados, “Bloque 74”, "Bloque 79" y "Bloque 83", situados en la provincia amazónica de Pastaza, en el este de Ecuador, de nuestro territorio ancestral. Y a las irregularidades para conseguir las mismas

Nosotras exigimos:

  1. El Respeto a Nuestros Derechos como Nación Indígena
  2. Conservación de nuestro Territorio, nuestra selvas y la amazonia ecuatoriana
  3. El respeto y conservación del área protegida y parque nacional yasuni
  4. La nulidad de los contrato con Andes Petroleum Ecuador.
  5. Se paralice la exploración en los “Bloque 74”, "Bloque 79" y "Bloque 83”
  6. No se realice la explotación de los yacimientos de los “Bloque 74”, "Bloque 79" y "Bloque 83“

Nuestro territorio se encuentra amenazado por transnacionales petroleras chinas. Nuestras nación y familias nos vemos vulnerados en nuestros derechos, en la perdida y contaminación de nuestro territorio. Estamos conscientes que las inversiones de esta magnitud traen otras consecuencias, como el incremento de las emisiones de gases invernaderos, deforestación ilícita, perdida de biodiversidad, entre otras.

Estamos dispuestas a proteger, defender y morir por nuestra selva, familias, territorio y nación. Y solicitamos a las organizaciones, naciones indígenas, sociedad civil y toda la población nacional e internacional, ha sumarse, apoyarnos en la firma de este pronunciamiento.

Click here to add your personal signature to the petition

Please email emily@wecaninternational.org with organizational or Executive Director sign-ons

JOIN OUR TEAM: WECAN Seeking Social Media/Web Intern

February 08, 2016

The Women's Earth and Climate Action Network (WECAN International) is seeking a Social Media/Web Intern to join a dynamic team of global women working for climate justice, systemic change and women's leadership in climate change solutions. The Social Media/Web Intern will work under the guidance of WECAN's Communications Coordinator to research, plan and manage social media accounts; create memes, flyers and visual content; and contribute to the WECAN blog. The ideal candidate will also support WECAN through basic video editing and production.

Objectives:

  • Keep a regular drumbeat of social media communications (Twitter, Facebook, Blogger, LinkedIn, etc) through weekly social media newsourcing, planning and management
  • Strengthen and build upon WECAN’s social media strategy
  • Support the messaging of our environmental and climate justice allies 

  • Build strategy to increase WECANs fans and followers and drive traffic to our website and social media pages
  • Develop and identify innovative messaging ideas
  • Contribute to WECAN blogs
 
Required Qualifications:
  • Previous experience managing social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, ect.) for a professional, not personal, cause
  • Creative eye for design and messaging
  • Background and active interest in issues of climate change, climate justice, women's rights, Indigenous peoples, activism, international policy and community organizing
  • Willingness to dedicate personal time to expand understanding of critical climate justice themes, UN climate negotiations and messaging
  • Knowledge of Photoshop, Illustrator or other comparable programs - ability to make 'meme' images, flyers and other dynamic visual content
  • Bachelors degree, current enrollment in college or university OR equivalent experience
  • Excellent writing skills and an enjoyment of writing 
  • Knowledge of intersectionality of issues such as climate justice, environmental racism, women’s rights, Indigenous rights 
  • Highly self-motivated and passionate about climate change
 
Preferred Qualifications:
  • Basic knowledge of video editing and ability to create short videos
  • Previous experience working for an environmentally focused/ climate justice non-profit

Internship Details:

  • This is an unpaid internship - WECAN is willing to work with your institution to satisfy credit requirements, volunteer hours, etc.
  • 10-12 hours per week
  • This is a remote position which may be carried out independently from any location.WECAN's Executive Director is based in California, USA on Pacific Standard Time - preference will be given to applicants living and working in a time zone that will facilitate easy communication between team members Interns are expected to have their own reliable computer, internet access, etc.
  • Minimum commitment is 4 months, though the ideal candidate will be available for 6 months
  • Application DEADLINE: March 10, 2016 - start date is flexible

All applications are due by March 10, 2016 - please send a cover letter, resume and references to emily@wecaninternational.org for consideration.