Women's Earth & Climate Action Network, International
The Women's Earth & Climate Action Network is a solutions-based, multi-faceted effort established to engage women worldwide to take action as powerful stakeholders in climate change and sustainability solutions. For Our Earth and Future Generations A project of Women's Earth and Climate Caucus and its partner eraGlobal Alliance
« Stories, Media and Messaging -- Communicating Climate Change, Solutions and New Cultural Narratives

Reacción Climática; Bolivian Young Women Tackling Climate Change

photo of Carmen Capriles

Started by: CarmenCapriles



Related Project:

climate change, bolivia, activism

Description:

Reacción Climática; Bolivian Young Women Tackling Climate Change

Given the environmental and socio-economic context in which the Bolivian population lives and the great threat due to climate change, Reacción Climática is responsible for promoting the participation of people to find solutions to the problems that climate change means the national context and international level and its implications for social, economic and environmental.

At the same time encourage both mitigation as well as adaptation, by generating awareness, capacity building, research, support for debate and action. It has a special focus on youth, because they are those who will be affected by long-term impacts, just as its mission is to provide solutions and alternatives to combat this problem.

Reasons for working in this topic, project or business:

Informed societies are able to influence their decision makers in order to advocate for solutions.

Root causes of the problems in this field and main barriers:

The greatest contributor to climate change (global warming) is CO2; the world must lower its CO2 emissions to a concentration of approximately 350 parts per million (ppm) to stabilize the planet´s temperature (Hansen, 2009) and therefore the climate. Data show that atmospheric concentration of CO2 hit a new peak  in 2011 (391.57 ppm), which is an increase of 2 ppm per year during the last 10 years and 40% greater than preindustrial levels

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